SHOP WYO: The Bent & Rusty Cotton Company, Laramie, WY

Hometown half page adWashakie Museum Fall 2015 WLM

Bent Rusty Cotton Company1 14We love The Bent & Rusty Cotton Company in Downtown Laramie! Be sure to keep up with their Facebook page for their regular barn sales (next one, November 28!), sales & specials!  Also … find your favorite Dead Drift Fly apparel in store! When you’re in Laramie, be sure to eat at J’s Steakhouse in Laramie, and enjoy (and SHOP!) Bent & Rusty while there! Below is just a little taste of what you can find in their shop at 117 E. Grand Avenue in Historic Downtown Laramie!

1506833_517871385036833_1304026211305665452_n 10986459_520115124812459_1016827819766599118_n 11140037_517871411703497_1412867473032338828_n 11225746_517878121702826_4474309819514414426_n 11248692_519737914850180_6748293531504871847_n 11695783_477125609111411_6247490346761901799_n 12049246_517871391703499_8270554893700404083_n 12115916_516325091858129_3207592277789174184_n 12141500_518648041625834_1288868830356892559_n 12141591_520424941448144_6379191876782915661_n 12191021_520424874781484_1583163945572156782_n 12193329_519647271525911_7737593410783635949_n

The Bent & Rusty Cotton Company

Address:  117 E. Grand Avenue  — Laramie, Wy

Phone:  307.460.9265

Website:  www.thebentandrusty.com

Facebook

 

Do you own a Wyoming store or business you want featured on our Shop WYO blog? It’s easy & inexpensive! Shoot us an email at editor@wyolifestyle.com for details!

 

 

 

 

MY WYOMING by Bill Sniffin – Two Funerals & A Golf Tourney

Washakie Museum Fall 2015 WLM

MY WYOMING:  Two Funerals Same Day + Golf Tourney,

Only in Small Town in a Very Small State

By Bill Sniffin

 

It might have been former U. S. Sen. Al Simpson who said all politics in Wyoming is personal.  I would expand on that by claiming Wyoming is such a small state that “everything is personal.”

On a recent Monday we experienced events that might only happen in a small town.  Two members of our community had died. Their families used different funeral homes. And, unfortunately, both funerals were scheduled the same time, Monday morning at 10.

Luckily, Lander is a city of about 7,500 people with not very long streets. We would try to be two places at once. This could get tricky.

Nancy loaded her famous scalloped potato dish that was required at the Catholic Church for Mickey Simmons Sr.’s funeral luncheon into my little car (easier to maneuver) and off we went to Holy Rosary.  I handed the dish to Annette Yates in the kitchen. Then we went to the front of the church.  After we signed Mickey’s guest book it was off to funeral #2 at United Methodist Church.

Joyce Nations Hornecker, 65, was a nice gal whose dad had been an editor years ago at our newspaper. She was revered for having operated the senior center for years.

After signing her guest book and greeting old friends like Cody Beers, Jean Mathisen Haugen, Sheriff Skip Hornecker, Pastor Mark Calhoun and City Councilman Dick Hudson, it was time to sit and listen to Ralph Mesa sing a few songs and hear about Joyce.  Her brother Jim Nations and her nephew Cody said some wonderful things and a slide show flashed life events about Joyce and her husband Johnny behind them on two big TV screens.

It was a nice funeral full of pioneer Wyoming folks. The Hornecker family has a long history in the Lander area, much of it in ranching.

Since we had sat in the back, we quietly slipped out and got into my little car and headed back to the Catholic Church.  Since Mickey’s service was a Mass I knew it would be longer so this was going to work out just fine.  Got there in time to sit with Mayor Del McOmie just behind former Mayor Mick Wolfe and his wife Marge.  Fr. James Schumacher and Deacon Rich Miller conducted the service.

The elder Simmons, 82, was a long time member of the parish and his son, Mickey Jr., had been public works director for Lander for many years.

After communion, the decedent’s eldest grandson, Lucas Anderson, gave a wonderful eulogy. In his tribute to his grandpa, he said the gentle older man left him with two big life lessons:  first was to always be willing to say you are sorry and second, to be quick to offer forgiveness.  Pretty neat lessons.

Lucas and Becky Murdock provided the vocals during the service. Becky plays one of the best cellos I have ever heard.

After the service we slipped out and drove back to the Methodist Church. There we joined the Hornecker family and friends having a brunch following and paid our respects to Joyce’s husband Johnny.

Not sure how many miles we put on but then went home and changed clothes and I headed to the golf course.

As a former vice-chairman of the Wyoming Aeronautics Commission, the annual Wyoming airport operators group meeting is always fun. They had invited me to be their banquet speaker. And since someone had cancelled a spot in their golf scramble, they asked if I wanted to play?  Sure, I told them, but I might be late since I have TWO funerals to attend that morning.

I managed to play the last nine holes with two guys who help run the Cheyenne airport.  Later Bob Hooper, Cody, who is president of the WAOA, called me a sandbagger.  I had luckily made four long putts in the nine holes I played and ended with a pretty good score.

That evening, we joined the airport folks.  There was a lot of gossip about the future of Wyoming’s home-owned airline Great Lakes.  Lately the struggling carrier has seen its market share slip. This has boosted flights out of Casper’s airport according to manager Glen Januska.

His staff counts license plates in their parking lots. He says on a typical day their lots are full of cars with Fremont, Johnson and Sheridan license plates.  It appears to be obvious that folks who used to fly out of Sheridan and Riverton on Great Lakes are now flying out of Casper.

 

Check out Bill Sniffin’s columns at www.billsniffin.com.  He is a longtime Wyoming journalist from Lander who has written six books. His newest is Wyoming at 125, which is now on sale at fine bookstores. His books are available at www.wyomingwonders.com.

Bill Sniffin WY at 125 October

 

Washakie Museum of Worland – Annie Get Your Gun & Mammoth Quick Draw Coming Up!

Washakie Museum Fall 2015 WLM

2015 Mammoth Quick Draw & Annie Get Your Gun October 24-25 — in Worland

by Jenn Simmons, Washakie Museum

images by David Huber Photography

 

The life-size bronze Columbian Mammoth stands guard outside the Washakie Museum and Cultural Center, enticing passers-by with its magnitude. Casper sculptor Chris Navarro created the mammoth that makes such a powerful first impression for travelers, but what is inside the museum keeps visitors there for hours.

Mammoth At Night

The Washakie Museum and Cultural Center in Worland, Wyoming, serves the Big Horn Basin as a history museum and an art and cultural center, as well as the local Visitor Center. The present 25,000 square foot facility opened in 2010 and houses two permanent exhibits: the Ancient Basin and the Last West, as well as a constantly changing temporary gallery. Dinosaurs, mammoths, rifles and a sheep wagon are only a fraction of the exhibits, many of which are interactive. The museum also holds lectures, book signings, community theater, formal dinners, live musical performances, children’s programs and art shows. Washakie Museum is a registered non-profit entity, operating on donations, membership fees, patron support, grants and fundraising efforts.

 

One of the most important fundraising events occurs in November:  the annual Mammoth Quick Draw. Hosted in partnership with the Worland Rotary Club, the Quick Draw is now in its fourth year. Both groups utilize the funds to improve facilities and opportunities in Wyoming and beyond. The Worland Rotary Club is heavily involved in funding both local and international projects including a cabin at the H Diamond 4H Camp, fitness equipment to improve Riverside Park, playground equipment for the Children’s Resource Center, and partnering with the Evanston Rotary to fund a latrine project in Guatemala. The Rotary Club in Worland also hosts and greatly assists in funding International Exchange Students. The Washakie Museum benefits from the work the artists create in the Quick Draw, and in return supports Wyoming artists through holding shows, sales and art education workshops. Mark McKenna, Robert Martinez, Ray Bower Jr., Linda Sopko, Gayle Barnett, Belinda Daugherty, Sam Angelo, Jim Davis, and Linda Jolley are some of the Quick Draw artists who return to the museum to exhibit their work and lead artist workshops for the community. The Quick Draw is an important fundraiser for both groups, but above all, it is an entertaining evening with music, food, and incredible art.

 

The 2015 Mammoth Quick Draw will be held November 20 from 5:30-10:00 PM at the Washakie Museum with tickets for $40. Executive Director Cheryl Reichelt says, “I hate to call it a party, but really, it is a fun event for everyone.” The evening begins at 5:30 PM with a gourmet meal by Chef Katy Hayes and live music by the Wyoming Fiddlers’ Association. Guests can eat and are encouraged to mingle with the artists who are set up throughout the building. Sam Angelo, a skilled wood turner out of Worland, humorously claims, “The Quick Draw turns an otherwise solitary and introspective behavior into a vaudeville act.” Angelo certainly plays to that aspect of the evening, setting up a camera and screen for his fans to better see the detail work he does. The audience of over 400 enjoys interacting with the artists—whether or not the artists are ready. Attendees also have the chance to examine and purchase additional works on display by each artist, and the “wall art” becomes part of the excitement.

Auction audience 2014

The Artists’ Quick Draw begins at 6:30 PM and lasts exactly one hour.  Artists have the option of either a Quick Draw or a Quick Finish. In a traditional Quick Draw, the artist creates and finishes an entire piece during the hour, while in a Quick Finish the artist finishes a piece previously started.  Watching the professional at work is an unusual opportunity for art lovers, and intoxicating part of the evening. Christine Dubbs, painter from Bozeman, Montana remarks, “It is a unique experience that allows artists to share part of the creative process with the public. I would like to think it offers an interesting perspective that the typical art viewer never gets to explore.” Guests are encouraged to observe that process, and many fan favorites are developed during this time.

 

At precisely 7:30 PM, the completed works go up for display in preparation for the final event of the evening–the live auction. The auction is conducted by Ed Keller, a local auctioneer who continues to donate his time every year for the event. Emcees for the evening are Mike Greear, Rotary member and state representative for Wyoming House District 27, and Martha Lawley, current Vice-President of the Washakie Museum’s Board of Directors, and are sure to entertain throughout the auction with their amusing banter with the crowd and artists. Any unsold art work remains on display through the end of the year, giving those who missed the event a chance to see and purchase the work by these skilled professionals.

Sam Angelo wood turner from Worland WY finishes a piece with a magnified video available for patrons to observe close work

The Mammoth Quick Draw event is growing to the benefit of the Rotary projects, the museum, and participating artists. The first auction sales were $18,000 with last year’s sales totaling $36,000. In addition, with the museum’s proceeds, nine artists have benefited by special exhibitions at the museum, gaining exposure and recognition for their talent. Gordon Neumann, Worland Rotary Member, states, “We get some of the best art and combine it with a very fun evening.”

 

The art is the real reason for the evening, and the art from the Mammoth Quick Draw is some of the finest in Northern Wyoming. Thirty artists are expected this year. The artists come from Wyoming, Montana and Northern Colorado. Most of the artists are returning favorites, often requested by patrons. Currently, Worland artists attending are Sam Angelo (woodturning), Tracy Myers (pyrography), Pam Greek (Raku), Jessica Salzman (beadwork), Cheri Shelp (textile weaving), Victoria Frisbee (printmaking), Brenda Suko (drawing), Kent Richins (oil painting), Darlene Hill (oil painting), and Victoria Bales (oil painting). Other returning artists include Steve Lillegard (Stanford, MT), Gail Patrick (mixed media, Manderson), Dustin Stephenson (pottery, Ten Sleep), Karyne Dunbar (mixed media, Shell), Belinda Daugherty (watercolor, Ten Sleep), Suzi Richards (acrylic, Basin), Gayle Barnett (watercolor, Meeteetse), Christine Dubbs (watercolor, Bozeman, MT), Robert Martinez (airbrush, Riverton), Linda Jolley (acrylic on slate, Greybull), Glenda Ramsey (watercolor, Thermopolis), and Mark McKenna (oil painting, Powell). Artists making their debut in the Quick Draw this year are Jim Hagstrom of Cody (painting), Tawni Shuler (mixed media) and CR Sadler (painting) both of Sheridan, and David Henderson of Basin (painting), Angela Siems of Thermopolis (painting and pastels), and Diana Dellos of Fort Collins (painting).

 

While the Mammoth Quick Draw is an important fundraising evening at the museum, it is only one of many historical and cultural events that take place this fall. Bill Sniffin arrived to sign books and lecture on Tuesday, September 15. Gayle Barnett, Meeteetse watercolor artist, opened her show the evening of October 2 with a Friday Night Wine Down and an artist workshop on October 3. Barnett’s show runs through October 31. “Seasons of Needlework,” a collaborative exhibit by Cross-Stitchers Anonymous and the Cottonwood Quilters, arrives for an opening on October 15, and the exhibit remains up through November 14. David Romvedt, a former Wyoming Poet Laureate, current instructor in the MFA writing program at UW, and accordion of music group The Fireants, celebrates his new novel on October 17 with a reading and performance of traditional Basque music.  Annie Get Your Gun is a community theater performance directed by museum performing arts staff on October 23-24 and will be performed at the Worland Middle School auditorium.

 

The 2015 Mammoth Quick Draw is November 20 and starts at 5:30 with tickets for $40. Tickets can be purchased on the Washakie Museum & Cultural Center website or Facebook page, at the museum, or through a local Rotary member. General Admission to the museum is $8 for adults, $7 seniors, $6 children 7-12, free to children 6 and under, and a family rate of $25. Washakie Museum is an AAA Listed Attraction with a discount on general admission for AAA members. Winter hours are Tuesday-Saturday, 9:00 AM-4:00 PM. The museum is located at 2200 Big Horn Avenue in Worland. Find out more about the Washakie Museum and Cultural Center, including upcoming events, at www.washakiemuseum.org or on the Facebook page www.facebook.com/washakiemuseum.

 

Wyoming Arts: Give Take Reception, Riverton

 

GIVE TAKE email CWC Reception

Give Take reception

The Central Wyoming College Gallery invites you to a reception for Give/Take exhibit on Oct 14, 2015, 5 pm – 7 pm. The gallery is in the Robert A Peck Arts Center, 2660 Peck Av., Riverton, WY.

Give/Take exhibition is a traveling art exhibition created by eleven women artists residing in Lander and Laramie. Linked in a focused exploration of “nourishment”, each artist explores how they need, receive and provide nourishment on many levels, including physical, mental and spiritual. The concept is ever more relevant today given the overwhelming amount of choices and information available, and given that the consequences of how we choose to nourish ourselves and others can have far-reaching impacts.

Works in the show present a variety of interpretations of the concept, and invite viewers to think about how they both give and receive nourishment in their own lives. The show consists of paintings, sculpture, fiber, original prints, ceramics, and assemblage pieces.

Give/Take Exhibition artists include, Dannine Donaho, Virginia Moore, Tonya Pepper, Jodie Atherton, Kristin Vogel, Sally Watt, Anne Austin, Lisa Hueneke, Mati Snodgrass, Maggie Kanengieter, and Cristin Zimmer. More information on the artists and their process as a group may be found at http://givetake.squarespace.com/

Give/Take art exhibition will be on display through Oct 27, 2015 at the Central Wyoming College Gallery and will be open during normal school hours. This traveling exhibition is made possible with generous support from the Wyoming Cultural Trust Fund.

When

Wed Oct 14, 2015 5pm – 7pm Mountain Time

Where

Robert A Peck Art Center, 2660 Peck Ave, Riverton, WY 82501, United States (map)

SOLD!!! Wyoming Real Estate: 111 Grand Ave Laramie, WY; Mountain Valley Properties

MVP Logo

 

113 E. Grand Ave. Laramie WY 82070

307.742.3000   www.mvprealestate.com   info@mvprealestate.com

 

THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD

Everything old is new again in this exceptional dual use historic downtown Laramie building. Exceptional location, exceptional renovation, and now an exceptional price! The top level offers top shelf living quarters with 12 foot ceilings, gourmet kitchen, fantastic bed/bath combo, and more than just a touch of whimsy. The main level is currently operated as a restaurant/wine bar (OK, it’s a Speakeasy), with a converted commercial kitchen area, but can just as easily be used as retail or office space. And, even the basement is finished, and features a sauna, steam room, office, shop, and more. The list of improvements are astounding and lengthy — please contact our office for more details, or better yet, a tour of this incredible downtown find! Business and Pleasure collide at an incredible price of $460, 000… All measurements and information contained herein is deemed accurate, but not guaranteed. Please verify if material to purchasing decision. Sellers are considering this sale to be part of a 1031 tax exchange, and all offers must contain language reflecting such. This listing also appears as a commercial listing on the Laramie MLS.

$460,000

Click here to visit Mountain Valley Properties’ listing & learn more…

000 002 004 006 008

Bill Sniffin: My Wyoming

1496552_777974585634242_8716324721559119604_o

MY WYOMING — by Bill Sniffin

Smoky times remind of state’s worst fires

 

As I write this, the beautiful view of the Wind River Mountains out of my window is obscured.  It is so smoky we are leaving our windows shut because it smells like a brush fire a short distance away.

In this case, that brush fire is 1,000 miles away.  Northern California and parts of Oregon and Washington are burning up.

This smoke is covering up towns all over Wyoming especially in the Big Horn Basin and Wind River Basin.

It is hard to find a city or town from Cheyenne to Evanston or Powell to Gillette in which smoke has not dominated the view. At least the sunsets and sunrises have been magnificent!

Here in Lander, we enjoyed one clear day between all the smoke from the northwest to local smoke from the Little Bob fire on the Wind River Indian Reservation.  They are letting it burn and it is over 1,500 acres and growing.

These ash clouds also remind of a time 27 years ago when Yellowstone National Park literally burned up. Here is what I recall of that event:

Is this hell?  Or is it Yellowstone? That was my exact thought as I piloted a small, single engine airplane over the vast expanse of Yellowstone National Park the first week of September, 1988, during the horrible fires that year.

Flying with me on that day was Larry Hastings, one of the best pilots and instructors in Wyoming history.  Also along and helping take photos was Mike McClure, a legend in his own right, as a premier photographer.

Both men lived in Lander. We had been talking about making this flight for some time.

It was my bright idea.  We had seen TV coverage of the fire but no one seemed to have a good aerial view.  I always want to figure out a way to take a big picture in the easiest way possible and flying over the park seemed the best plan.

Hastings was aware of the altitude restrictions, which caused us to be quite high as we flew over the world’s oldest national park while it was literally burning up.

The view was both impressive and unimpressive.  It was impressive because as far as the eye could see was smoke.  It was unimpressive because it was impossible to make out landmarks.  Not even the mountains were very visible.

What was visible were a large number of hotspots where fire would shoot 200 feet in the air.  It was hot down there.  The park I loved was going to be changed forever.

That event two and half decades ago was unprecedented in the history of the National Park Service.  There were contrasting programs of fire suppression and “controlled burns” in place, which caused the people responsible for the park’s existence to be incapable of dealing with the conflagration.

Cities and towns in a wide circle around the park enjoyed the most colorful sunsets in history.  Lander, which is a two-hour drive southeast from YNP, the evening views were unprecedented.  It was an awful time for folks with respiratory problems.  No wind and no rain could relieve these conditions.

Fighting the fires in 1988 cost $120 million which is $230 million in today’s dollars – almost a quarter of a billion dollars. It covered some 800,000 acres or over one third of the park.

Biggest fire was the North Fork fire, which was started July 22 by a cigarette dropped by a man cutting timber in the neighboring Targhee National Forest.

One of the most amazing scenes of this fire was when embers from it were sent airborne across the massive Lewis Lake by 80 mph winds setting new fires on the other side of the lake.

This complex of fires burned 140,000 acres and was finally extinguished when some welcome rains fell later that fall.

Stories about other parts of the park and the valiant effort of more than 13,000 firefighters, 120 helicopters and other aerial devices, plus National Guard and civilians detail bravery but were to no avail.  Important structures like Old Faithful Inn and the Lake Hotel were saved but efforts to stop the fires proved to be impossible.

Mother Nature wanted that fire to burn and it did until she was ready to put it out.

And that memorable day 27 years ago we were flying above a scene right out of Dante’s Inferno. I experienced a memory that I would both like to forget and yet, always recall.

 

Check out Bill Sniffin’s columns at www.billsniffin.com.  He is a longtime Wyoming journalist from Lander who has written six books. His newest is Wyoming at 125, which is coming out in September. His books are available at www.wyomingwonders.com.

 

FROM THE PARKS: Fourth Graders Welcome at GTNP!

 

findYourPark2_520

Grand Teton National Park Welcomes Fourth-Grade Students

New Program Encourages Families and Classes to Visit National Parks

MOOSE, WY — Grand Teton National Park invites all fourth-grade students to visit the park for free as part of the White House’s new Every Kid in a Park program. Fourth-grade students can visit https://www.everykidinapark.gov/ to complete an activity and obtain a voucher for a free annual entry pass to more than 2,000 federal recreation areas and lands, including national parks.

Grand Teton National Park Superintendent David Vela said, “We invite all fourth graders and their families, as well as fourth-grade classes, to the park to discover, learn and have fun.” Vela said one of the goals of the program is to connect young people with the great outdoors.

To receive a voucher for their free pass for national parks, fourth graders can visit the Every Kid in a Park website and play a game to access their special voucher. Fourth graders and their families can then obtain a pass for free entry to national parks and other federal public lands and waters across the country from now through August 31, 2016.  The website also includes fun and engaging learning activities aligned to educational standards, trip planning tools, safety and packing tips and other important and helpful information for educators and parents.

In addition to providing every fourth grader in America a free entry pass for national parks and federal public lands and waters, fourth grade educators, youth group leaders and their students can participate in the program through field trips and other learning experiences.

Grand Teton National Park offers a “Weather Wonders” snow science field trip for fourth-grade classes and geology field trips in the fall and spring.  The distance-learning program “Snow Desk” broadcasts live to schools around the country during the winter.

Park personnel will be at Colter Elementary in Jackson Hole to share information at the fourth-grade parents’ night on Wednesday, September 16 from 6-7 p.m. Other schools and fourth-grade teachers that are interested in the program should contact Megan Kohli at grte_education@nps.gov or call 307-739-3656.

Information about additional educational opportunities with Grand Teton National Park such as curriculum materials, field trips, traveling trunks, distance learning and more is available at http://www.nps.gov/grte/learn/education/for-teachers.htm.

The goal of the Every Kid in a Park program is to connect fourth graders with the great outdoors and inspire them to become future environmental stewards, ready to preserve and protect national parks and other public lands for years to come.  The program is an important part of the National Park Service’s centennial celebration in 2016, which encourages everyone to Find Your Park.

Every Kid in a Park is a government-wide effort, launched by President Obama, and supported by eight federal agencies, including the National Park Service, the Army Corps of Engineers, Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Reclamation, Department of Education, Fish and Wildlife Service, Forest Service, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

WY Beef Summer WLM 2015

 

Orvis Fly Fishing School Partnership with Snake River Sporting Club

 

1307997561ORVIS_LOGO

SNAKE RIVER SPORTING CLUB AND ORVIS ANNOUNCE NEW FLY FISHING SCHOOL PARTNERSHIP

Orvis School Will Be First In Wyoming and Continues to Enhance Club Experience

 

January 7, 2015 (Jackson Hole, WY) Snake River Sporting Club, Jackson Hole’s premier private club and residential community, is partnering with Orvis and Jackson Hole Fly Fishing School to host the newly launched Orvis Fly Fishing School – Jackson Hole, the renowned outfitters first such school in Wyoming. A series of 10 two-day intensive classes, combining classroom programming and “on-stream” instruction led by Orvis Fly Fishing Instructor Spencer Morton, will be open to fly fishing enthusiasts from around the globe.

 

Starting in July, the two-day courses run throughout Summer and Fall 2015 offering an in-depth exploration of fly fishing fundamentals and techniques, including tying essential knots, choosing gear and tackle, proper fly selection, reading water and currents and general entomology. Taking advantage of the Club’s premier and private access to six miles of Blue-Ribbon fishing on the Snake River, each student will receive an exclusive hands-on lesson with personalized attention from an expert instructor, for both beginner and expert levels. Pricing is $489.00 per student and includes use of top-notch fly fishing equipment and meals at the Snake River Sporting Club’s Clubhouse. A full schedule of school dates is available at www.orvis.com/schools.

 

“Jackson Hole is a hot-bed for fly fishing,” says Scott McEnaney, Orvis’ Eastern endorsed operations director. “This is Orvis’ first foray into Wyoming and we identified two great partners in Jackson Hole Fly Fishing School and Snake River Sporting Club. We are excited to host the schools at the Sporting Club— it’s the ideal location for our newest outlet.”

 

Just one year after reopening, Snake River Sporting Club thrives as Wyoming’s foremost outdoor adventure playground, following a multi-million dollar reinvestment plan by new ownership group, Atlanta-based Cygnus Capital. The Club now has more than 175 members who can enjoy a variety of new and updated amenities, including the completed 26,000 sq. ft. Clubhouse facility, restored Tom Weiskopf championship golf course, new Equestrian Center and a variety of outdoor sporting activities such as 3D archery, shooting clays and more. A collection of turnkey luxury cabins was completed in summer 2014 and sold within four months of hitting the market, resulting in current construction of additional real estate, per member demand.

 

The continued revitalization of the club filters back into the greater Jackson Hole community. One percent of annual real estate sales are donated to the Teton Education Foundation, with a total of $683,000 donated to the local organization to date. “Reinvesting back to Jackson Hole is very important to us,” says Jeff Heilbrun, general manager and chief operating officer of Snake River Sporting Club. “The partnership with Orvis is another way can serve the community, and we are proud to help bring these world-class schools to Jackson Hole and welcome a host of fishing enthusiasts in 2015.”

 

To enroll in the Orvis Fly Fishing School – Jackson Hole, please visit www.orvis.com/schools or call (866) 531-6213. For more information on Snake River Sporting Club, please visit www.snakeriversportingclub.com or call(307) 200-3114.

 

About Snake River Sporting Club:

Located just south of the confluence of the Snake and Hoback rivers, Snake River Sporting Club provides a comprehensive Jackson Hole experience within a private club environment. Situated on 800-acres of verdant topography, the Club and Ranch embrace natural surroundings and celebrate the beauty and ruggedness of the wilderness. The four season residential community and private club offers world class golf on a Tom Weiskopf-designed championship course, fly fishing along the famed Snake River, hiking trails to be traveled by foot or mountain bike, equestrian facilities, archery and shooting clays, children’s programs and more. In the winter, residents and club members enjoy snowshoeing, ice skating, cross country skiing, as well as private Après ski and valet service at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort. www.snakeriversportingclub.com

 

NEWS FROM THE PARKS: Nuisance Black Bear with Cub Captured & Relocated to Zoo

Nuisance Black Bear with Cub Captured & Relocated to Zoo

From National Park Service

MOOSE, WY — On Wednesday afternoon, August 19, Grand Teton National Park biologists captured a female black bear and her cub that on numerous occasions acquired human food items left unattended by visitors to the String, Leigh, and Jenny Lake areas.  Due to a long history of nuisance behavior, this bear and her cub were removed from the park and relocated to the Great Plains Zoo in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, on Saturday, August 22. The decision to remove the bears from the park was made out of concern for public safety.

On Friday afternoon, August 14, park rangers hazed the adult black bear away from the String Lake picnic area. The two bears then ventured into the Teton backcountry where, later that weekend, the mother black bear was photographed tearing into a backpack and stomping on a tent at a backcountry campsite in her search for food.

Once captured, the female was identified as one that has gotten into coolers, backpacks, picnics, trash bags, and tote bags in search of human food on 17 occasions between 2012 and 2014. This behavior indicated the bear had become conditioned to associate humans with food. She was teaching her young cub that same undesirable behavior. Park managers welcomed the opportunity to relocate both of these bears to the same zoo as the alternative would have likely included separation of the cub from its mother and euthanization of the adult.

It is worth noting that failure by park visitors—including local residents—to properly secure food items and other scented items led to this action to remove the bears from their native habitat. This female bear has repeatedly gotten into backpacks and coolers left unattended by people who were swimming and picnicking in the String Lake and Leigh Lake areas.

In the past three years, park staff have seen numerous food storage violations by visitors using the String Lake beaches and picnic areas. People have left unsecured food items unattended while they enjoy wading, swimming, and boating on String Lake, and there have been many reports of black bears receiving human food. Because of this pattern of careless food storage, park officials are considering management actions including a prohibition against food items in this area.

Although cliché, it is too often true that a fed bear is a dead bear. A human food-conditioned female black bear was euthanized in mid-June out of concern for public safety after it climbed into the trunk of a vehicle and attempted to enter cabins at Jenny Lake Lodge. Fortunately, this newly captured black bear and her cub will not suffer that same fate. However, placement of wild bears in zoos is not always a viable option, and park visitors must realize that careless actions can lead to the death of bears that have been corrupted by human food. Once a bear acquires human food, it loses its fear of people and may become dangerous. Human carelessness doesn’t just endanger people; it can also result in a bear’s death.

Park officials strongly remind local residents and visitors that proper storage of food items and disposal of garbage is vitally important. With simple actions, people can help keep a bear from becoming human food-conditioned and possibly save its life. Detailed information about how to behave in bear country is available at park visitor centers and online at www.nps.gov/grte.

NEWS FROM THE PARKS: Caution Floating the Snake

WY Beef Summer WLM 2015

Rangers Caution Visitors Floating the Snake River Between Deadman’s Bar and Moose Landing

MOOSE, WY Grand Teton National Park / National Park Service — After a recent spate of incidents on the stretch of the Snake River between Deadman’s Bar and Moose Landing, Grand Teton National Park Rangers are cautioning boaters to choose segments of river that are appropriate for their experience and ability level. Rangers have conducted rescues on the Snake River near the Bar BC Ranch for five separate parties since August 1, 2015. Though nobody was seriously injured in the incidents, the consequences of such accidents on the Snake River can be catastrophic.

Though the Snake River in Grand Teton National Park does not consist of any whitewater, it is a complex and unpredictable braided river. A strong current, shifting channels, numerous logjams, eddies, and snags all combine to make floating the Snake a challenging proposition.  These obstacles often require floaters to set up maneuvers well in advance, and inexperienced pilots often make maneuvers too late.

A raft hung up on a snag in the Snake River near Bar BC Ranch. National Park Service Photo.
A raft hung up on a snag in the Snake River near Bar BC Ranch. National Park Service Photo.

Rangers have assigned difficulty levels to the various stretches of river in the park. The section from Deadman’s Bar to Moose Landing, where all of the recent incidents have occurred, is rated “advanced.” In all five incidents, the parties involved likely did not possess appropriate skill and experience to be floating an advanced section of river. Good alternative river segments include Pacific Creek Landing to Deadman’s Bar (rated “intermediate”) and Jackson Lake Dam to Pacific Creek Landing (rated “beginner”).

The five incidents fortunately did not result in significant injuries to those involved. However, the incidents did result in several minor injuries, damaged equipment, and in one case a destroyed vessel. The five parties were respectively operating a canoe, a kayak, a raft, and two drift boats. Some of the visitors involved were local residents. In some cases, the parties were able to self-rescue and were floated to safety by rangers. In others, rangers rescued the visitors hung-up on obstructions using swift water rescue techniques. Grand Teton Lodge Company and Triangle X river guides assisted with two of the rescues.

Rangers urge all visitors planning to float the Snake River to select their river segment based on an accurate assessment of their group’s ability level. River information can be obtained at all park visitor centers. Both a park boat permit and a State of Wyoming Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) decal are required before launching on any park waters. Additionally, all watercraft entering the park are subject to an AIS inspection when checkpoints are operating.

Downtown Rock Springs – Blues & Brews and Art Work!

11267881_1589820901297099_8010607675883093466_n

Create art to color the pedestrian underpass in
Downtown Rock Springs

 Rock Springs, WY –  The Rock Springs Main Street/Urban Renewal Agency is pleased to announce the Art Underground Gallery, an exciting new project designed to bring life, color and art to the pedestrian underpass in Downtown Rock Springs.  The gallery is also meant encourage the community to get involved in adding color and creativity to our public spaces. Residents of all ages are invited to create an individual mural that will be displayed in the underpass, semi-permanently.

A limited number of primed canvases (2’ by 4’ plywood) are available for the community to pick up, free of charge.  They can be picked up from the Rock Springs Main Street/URA office at 603 S Main Street in Downtown Rock Springs.   Completed canvases should be returned to the Rock Springs Main Street/URA office by September 1, 2015.  Because there are a limited number of canvases, they are available on a first come, first served basis.  Once all canvases have been given out, we can no longer accept entries.

Print

Guidelines for murals:

  • All artwork must be the artist’s individual work in design and execution.
  • Work must be able to withstand outdoor display; two coats of marine grade primer are highly recommended.
  • Work must be suitable for all ages.
  • Committee has the right to determine the suitability of work.
  • All mediums and themes are welcome.
  • Canvases will be displayed in the pedestrian underpass which can be somewhat dark so artists are encouraged to created pieces that are bright and colorful.

The installation will be unveiled at a ribbon cutting and public reception on September 16. Submissions will be photographed and posted on the Downtown Rock Springs Facebook page.  For entry forms and more details, visit DowntownRS.com, or call 307-352-1434. Special thanks to Superior Lumber & Bloedorn Lumber for the supplies.

 

Blues & Brews – Another Success August 08, 2015!

Downtown Rock Springs has a few Blues & Brews glasses left for purchase at the office! Two glasses for $10 via their office at 603 S. Main!

 

Blues n Brews RS August0 8 2015

Blues n Brews glasses Aug 08 2015

WYOMING MADE: Lazy KT Designs, Gillette

11267881_1589820901297099_8010607675883093466_n

11060313_1033036893387252_99726894192689149_n

1535704_298742700282947_9029360791578478920_n

TO CONTACT:  785.200.0487 kaitlynmartin@outlook.com www.lazyktdesigns.com

We were excited to profile Lazy KT Designs and owner Kaitlyn’s friend The Rusty Bucket (also of Gillette) in our Sprinter 2015 issue of WLM. These two ladies excel in producing fun & unique products right here in Wyoming! Lazy KT Designs just released a really cool series of antique ceiling tile artwork, and we asked for a chance to share it with our readers … See below for Lazy KT Designs’ contact info, and be sure to visit the Wyoming

First Program’s cabin at the Wyoming State Fair through August 15 for a chance to check out LOTS of Wyoming-made products! (And October 2&3, Wyoming stores can visit our Wyoming Made Expo to see products they can carry in their stores, too!)

Lazy KT Designs website

Lazy KT Designs Facebook page

Wyoming First Program Facebook page

Wyoming Made Expo event Facebook page (October 2&3, 2015 in Douglas!)

 

August 2015

August 2015 2

August 2015 3

August 2015 4

August 2015 5

August 2015 6

August 2015 7

August 2015 8

August 2015 9

NEWS FROM THE PARKS: Ride Menor’s Ferry at Grand Teton National Park

WY Beef Summer WLM 2015

FROM GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARK:  Ride Menor’s Ferry & Experience Early Method of River Crossing on the Snake

MOOSE, WY — Ever wondered how Jackson Hole’s early settlers crossed the Snake River before bridges? Beginning Monday, July 20, visitors can take a ride on a replica ferry boat and experience crossing the Snake in the same fashion provided by Bill Menor through his routine ferry service of the late 1800s and early 1900s. Park ranger naturalists will offer free rides daily from 9:00–10:15 a.m. and 1:15–2:15 p.m., as well as before and after the ranger-led program, “A Walk into the Past,” that occurs each day at 2:30 p.m.  Call 307.739.3399 for additional operation times.

The wooden ferry boat serves as a central feature of the Menor/Noble Historic District, located just north of the Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center in Grand Teton National Park.  Ferry rides transport visitors across the Snake River from Menor’s general store on the west bank of the river to Dornan’s on the east bank—and back.

 

Menors Ferry July 2015

Menor’s Ferry consists of a wooden platform deck placed upon two pontoons for flotation. The ferry is tethered to a cable system that spans the river and operates by directing the pontoons toward the opposite riverbank, allowing the power of the current to push the craft across the river channel. The system uses river power—rather than motor power—to push the ferry across the water. This type of river travel existed in ancient times and was widely used throughout the United States.

Menor’s Ferry played a vital role in providing safe transport for passengers over the swift-flowing Snake River before construction of a bridge. Prior to the ferry’s existence, the Snake River was essentially impassable from Wilson to Moran—except during low water periods in the fall and winter months. As a man of vision, Bill Menor saw the need for a more convenient access across the Snake River and consequently built and operated his ferry from 1894 until 1918 when he sold it to Maud Noble. Maud operated the ferry until 1927 when its use became obsolete after a steel truss bridge was constructed across the river, allowing for vehicles and foot traffic to cross without the assistance of a ferry service.

Although transportation has changed over time, Menor’s Ferry offers a chance to step back into the past and experience a bygone time and historic mode of river passage.

 

  Menors Ferry July 2015 2

Menors Ferry July 2015 3

COWBOY TOUGH ADVENTURE RACE

WY Beef Summer WLM 2015

CHECK OUT ALL THE TEAMS AT THE CAMECO COWBOY TOUGH ADVENTURE WEEK WEBSITE:  http://www.cowboytoughwy.com/#!teamroster/c1aam

11209751_989690977738544_4587040534354808049_n

 

 

cOWBOY tOUGH RACE 2015

FROM WIND RIVER COUNTRY TOURISM:

Cowboy Tough Adventure Race, Here We Come! Lander Athletes Represent Wind River Country at the 2015 Cowboy Tough Adventure Race (July 16 –July 19)

 

Wyoming – “So what are you up to this weekend?”

“Oh we’re just headed to Buffalo to do a little trekking through the Bighorns, some mountain and fire road biking, a little Class III whitewater boating, and a touch of orienteering with 100 athletes from over the globe for an 84-hour adventure race ending in Casper.”

Here in Wind River Country, chances are you know one: your neighbor, best friend, co-worker, or even you and your partner are considered an “adventure athlete.” Whether you weekend-warrior up to Wind River’s Stough Creek for a 21-mile fishing excursion, wake up at 5am to run the Tomato Loop, bushwhack with topo maps through the Red Desert to find petroglyphs, ride at-skis/fat bikes/stout horses through the backcountry—there’s a familiar, prevalent breed of (and unspoken camaraderie among) outdoor-forward humans throughout Fremont County.

No surprise that Fremont County has its own adventure race team, for its second year, competing in Wyoming’s 2015 Cowboy Tough Adventure Race. Sponsored by the Wind River Visitors Council, Team Wind River Country is a coed team of four, all residents of Lander.

Captain Charles (Chuck) Schuster crunches 0’s and 1’s by day for Wyoming Life Resource Center. He and his Cowboy Tough teammate and wife Karla Wagner, a local OB/GYN physician, originally got the adventure racing bug at the annual Leadville 100 MTB (mountain biking) race. (Where they spend over ten hours biking 100 miles over 14,000 feet of elevation gain. Each year. On a tandem bike. For fun.)

Returning for a second round, Wind River Country teammate Shad Hamilton is principal at Fort Washakie, a husband, and father of two. Having met in 2006 at the cycling club, Shad has joined Schuster-Wagner on several Leadville races and adventures through the backcountry. Hamilton paddled a canoe singlehandedly across Boysen Reservoir for one leg of last year’s Cowboy Tough to keep the team rolling through an injury and brief and unofficial checkpoint in the Emergency Room. Shad’s wife jokingly refers to Chuck as “that friend” (who drags him out for days and hours of insanity.) We’re not sure if that’s better than a weekly game of poker with the guys or not.

Brad Young is a husband, father, Army veteran, and the newest member of Team Wind River Country. A behavioral therapist at the Wyoming Life Resource Center, Brad was inspired by Chuck’s endeavors over office water cooler conversations, and effectively turned curiosity into action. After surviving his “first date” with the team at the Teton Ogre Adventure Race in June 2014, Brad has been training and on board for Cowboy Tough ever since.

The 2015 Cowboy Tough race-course this year is set for a start in Buffalo, a gentle meander through the Big Horns (ha) and finish line in Casper. 360-430 miles of trekking, paddling, orienteering, fire road biking, single track biking, mountain and road biking, and plenty of checkpoint challenges over the course of four days. Teams are completely independent and self-sufficient for food and water, and are allowed one tote box on an eighteen-wheeler for transition stations. What does that mean? Racing “re-starts” each morning at 7am and even if you rolled into the transition station at 2am, you have to get your food, sleep, and gear ready to start all over again.

Paula McCormick, marketing director of the Wind River Visitor’s Council was adamant about supporting the team in its second year. “Wind River Country is known for its mountains, rivers, trails, and unparalleled terrain from high desert to alpine. Even more so are the people that live here. There’s a pool of adventure athletes who are ‘Cowboy Tough’ and we are thrilled to support them… and have Wind River Country represented at an international (and Wyoming) competition that receives global exposure. These are the people we run by on the trail or see out on the mountain pass. They are our own.”

To get a sense of what this year’s race looks like, look at the video and photos from last year’s race that started in Fremont County. http://www.cowboytoughwy.com/ – !media/c9v9

You can track Fremont County’s team during the race on posts on our Wind River Country Facebook page athttps://www.facebook.com/WyomingsWindRiverCountry?fref=ts

Related Links: Lander Chamber of CommerceRiverton Chamber of Commerce, Dubois Chamber of CommerceDestination Dubois

ON THE CALENDAR: 75th Annual Laramie Jubilee Days

LJD red logo

It’s the 75th annual Laramie Jubilee Days this year, and we LOVE this annual event in our hometown! We’re very excited to be sponsors this year – look for our logo at the rodeos, and we hope to see you in the stands! Also our Laramie Dance & Arts Center will be in the Jubilee Days parade on Saturday morning, kicking up our boots – we hope to see you there, and buzz us at 307.742.6767 if you’d like to join our swing dance group at Friday night’s street dance! (We’ve got some great classes for all levels!) Next Line Dance Party night is Friday, July 31!

LJD-2015 proof

Calendar of Laramie Jubilee Days Events for Thursday – Sunday, July 9-12 …

Thursday, July 9th
10 AM — Mr. T Bull Riding Golf Tournament, Laramie Country Club
4:45 PM — Flaming Gorge Jalapeno Contest, Downtown Laramie
5:30-Midnight — Live Music, Downtown Laramie
7 PM — Mr. T Extreme Bull Riding, Albany County Fairgrounds 

Friday, July 10th
6-9 AM — Jeff Thompson Pancake Breakfast hosted by DLBA and Kiwanis, North Depot Park, Downtown Laramie*
7 AM — PRCA Rodeo Slack, Albany County Fairgrounds
11 AM-2 PM — Wyoming State Celebration, Wyoming Territorial Prison State Historic Site*
                          Live Music, Downtown Laramie
3 PM — Farmer’s Market, Downtown Laramie*
           Maurice’s Fashion Show, Downtown Laramie*
2:30-5:30 PM — Live Music, Downtown Laramie Stage
6:30 PM — PRCA Rodeo Performance, Albany County Fairgrounds
6-8:45 PM — Live Music, Downtown Laramie
9:15-Midnight — Live Music, Downtown Laramie 

Saturday, July 11th
10 AM — Parade, Downtown Laramie
11 AM — Hits 106 Chili Cook-off, Downtown Laramie*
11-2 PM — Live Music, Downtown Laramie Stage
11 AM-3 PM — Laramie Cowbelles BBQ, Downtown Laramie*
ACPE Ice Cream Social, Ace Parking Lot*
Noon-11 PM — Carnival, Downtown Laramie
1-6 PM — Downtown Laramie Brew Fest, North Depot Park, Downtown Laramie*
1 PM — Queens Luncheon, Cavalryman Supper Club
2:30-5:30 PM — Live Music, Downtown Laramie Stage
6-8:30 PM — Live Music, Downtown Laramie Stage
6:30 PM — PRCA Rodeo Performance, Albany County Fairgrounds
9-Midnight — Live Music
, Downtown Laramie
9:30 PM (after PRCA) — WPRA Barrel Racing Slack, Albany County Fairgrounds 

Sunday, July 12th
10 AM-3 PM — Jubilee Fest on the Ivinson Lawn, Laramie Plains Museum*
1 PM — PRCA Rodeo Performance, Albany County Fairgrounds