WYOMING MADE: NoSo Patches Brings Personality to Your Outerwear

LANDER LIVE EVENTS COMING UP!

THURSDAY, JULY 27, 6-9 PM –> THE ITALS

FREE CONCERT AT JAYCEES PARK!

MORE INFO AT … LANDERLIVEMUSIC.COM

 

Noso Puffy Patches of Jackson:  Personality for Your Outerwear

text & images courtesy Noso Puffy Patches

Visit them online:  nosopatches.com

Noso Puffy Patches was launched in Summer 2016, using a combination of crowdfunding and direct retailer outreach to make the patches accessible to the widest range of consumers, just in time for the biggest outdoor season. Based in Jackson, Wyoming, and manufactured in the USA, NOSO presents Puffy Patches, the fashionable do-it-yourself repair and embellishment patches for clothes and outdoor gear.

NOSO Puffy Patches are the coolest all-purpose patches that fix rips, holes and gashes, or just a lack of personal style. Make your jacket eye catching, not for the holes, but for the design you’ve created. Personalize your long-life gear like sleeping bags, tents or the apparel you love most, whether it’s a nylon windbreaker or down jackets, anything can be revamped or restored.

When your favorite jacket springs a leak, NOSO Puffy Patches save the day with style and versatility. Super easy to use, Puffy Patches are made of 30D nylon ripstop, uncoated and down proof with a high tenacity and heat/light inhibiting qualities. NOSO’s adhesive lasts longer than others on the market. No sewing necessary, the heat-activated technology creates a permanent bond without an iron. Just throw it in the dryer or better yet, leave it in the sun to activate. Puffy Patches are incredibly durable and can withstand extreme weather conditions and multiple washes, without gumming up on the sides.

“I am extremely excited to launch NOSO Puffy Patches,” says Kelli Jones, Founder at NOSO. “I wanted to find a better way to extend the life of your favorite gear, as well as an outlet for users to express themselves in the outdoor space. It has been an amazing process, and I’m thrilled with the product and the possibilities.”

To extend the life of your gear, or express your individuality, Puffy Patches are available in six different colors, thirteen shapes, and five variety packages of three. They are available for purchase online!

All patches come in the following colors:

Fall Colors with Steve Stanze

laramie-fall-poster-2016www-poster-2016

I was up in Laramie, Wyoming last weekend visiting my grandparents with my sister. We came up to visit them for two weeks when we were kids and wanted to relive some of the memories. Saw a mama moose and two babies right off a trail in Vedauwoo and caught the beautiful scenery in the Snowy Range Mountains.

–Steve Stanze, St. Louis

*(Thanks, Steve!)*

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WHAT’S YOUR WYOMING ADVENTURE? from Tyler Halford

Curiosity Shoppe JPEGCody Chamber Sprinter 2016

We’d love to share your Wyoming adventure! Whether it’s a trip, an annual adventure, if you’re from out of state or a Wyoming native, we want to share! Email editor@wyolifestyle.com or message our Facebook page to share your adventure for our blog series!

What’s Your Wyoming Adventure?

from Tyler Halford

Star Valley native now living in Kentucky

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Our annual camping trips consists of five Star Valley High graduates, one from 2000, one from 2001, and three from 2002, all five now married with children. To date, it has just been the 5 of us who attend, no children or wives (sounds mean but it just wouldn’t be the same!). It started in the summer of 2007 but we didn’t have intentions then of making it an annual event. Our first annual was in Star Valley and hardly consisted of “camping,” though we did sit around a fire. In 2008 we again met in Star Valley, though again it was mostly just sitting around a camp fire in town. Even though none of us live in Star Valley anymore, we all five have commuted back each year. I’ve come as far as Kansas for two annuals and Kentucky for four of them! We decided for the 3rd annual we’d make it more of a camping trip — so for the 3rd and 4th annuals we camped in Swift Creek campground just outside Afton. The 5th-9th annuals were all legitimately remote camping, all up Grey’s River, staying mostly at Forest Service guard stations.

Our activities primarily entail hunting ground squirrels, fishing, and hiking to various lakes along the Grey’s Range. We’ve been incredibly fortunate to see a wolf on one occasion and two wolverines on another occasion — most Wyoming natives have lived around but never seen wolverines.

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These camping trips are beyond memorable and cherished. As I mentioned, living in Kansas and Kentucky for a combined six years didn’t stop me from making them happen. They’re the most memorable experiences I’ve had outside of raising a family.

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EXPLORE WYOMING: National Bighorn Sheep Center, Dubois

There are so many wonderful gems in our square state that are wonderful places to explore! If a Wyoming vacation is on your travel plans for this year, be sure to consider heading to Dubois – where the opportunities are endless for great recreation! The National Bighorn Sheep Center is just one wonderful place you must visit while you’re there. We enjoyed reading their end of year e-blast so much that we wanted to share their news with all our readers too …

Visit the National Bighorn Sheep Center in Dubois Online

From the National Bighorn Sheep Center …

Happy Holidays!

We thank you for your support, whether as a member, visitor, volunteer or partner organization of the National Bighorn Sheep Interpretive Association. You have helped make 2015 one of the best years yet for visitation to the Center and participation in our new programs and events. Check out a few photos and highlights from 2015 below.

Please consider a year-end gift to support our work in 2016. You can donate here. With your special gift of $25, $50 or $100, we’ll be educating more youth, offering new programs and supporting stewardship of our favorite wild critter, the bighorn.
Our Heroes

We want to recognize a few of our amazing volunteers who help make the magic happen here at the National Bighorn Sheep Center. Whether it’s Boyd Livingston who consistently plows our parking lot after a big snowstorm or Bill and Lori Sincavage and Karen and Mike McCullough who lend their expertise with our database, Bighorn Bash and agency research assistance, these volunteers are the backbone of our organization. Just to name a few others, Morgan Nimtz of SOAR has been a fabulous volunteer who helped display our new “Fred Bicksler” photo exhibit in the Ron Ball Gallery and spruced up our desert bighorn habitat. Additionally, Laney Hicks, Cheryl O’Brien and Carolyn Gillette have been sharing great insights and expertise for our education and communications committee efforts. Our Board of Directors made up of Mark Hinschberger, Bruce Thompson, Kathy Treanor,Mary Ann Eastman, Trudy Trevarthen and Brandon Houckare also volunteers who pitch in to lend their expertise, time and vision to our organization.

We’d especially like to say THANK YOU to our outgoing Board President Mark Hinschberger. Mark has been involved with the Bighorn Sheep Center for its entire 23 years, whether as the Forest Service Biologist with the Whiskey Mountain Technical Committee in the earlier years or as THE go-to guy for all things Bighorn Bash-related (our annual fundraiser). The organization is what it is today in large part due to Mark’s leadership, passion and commitment. We thank you, Mark for all you have done for the National Bighorn Sheep Interpretive Association and for bighorns!!

Thank you ALL for your commitment and hard work helping us do the important job of educating the public about bighorns! Please see a few highlights of our great volunteers below, and if you’re interested in lending a hand with upcoming projects and events, contact us today.

Outgoing Board President, life member and bighorn extraordinaire Mark Hinschberger sharing some insights and great views atop Torrey Rim during our September 2015 "Where Bighorns Roam" tour (photo courtsey of Sara Domek).
Outgoing Board President, life member and bighorn extraordinaire Mark Hinschberger sharing some insights and great views atop Torrey Rim during our September 2015 “Where Bighorns Roam” tour (photo courtsey of Sara Domek).
Volunteer, member and committee member Carolyn Gillette visits with volunteer/life member Lynn Stewart and member Mark Domek during the June 2015 Bighorn Rendezvous event at the National Bighorn Sheep Interpretive Center (photo courtesy of Bruce S. Thompson).
Volunteer, member and committee member Carolyn Gillette visits with volunteer/life member Lynn Stewart and member Mark Domek during the June 2015 Bighorn Rendezvous event at the National Bighorn Sheep Interpretive Center (photo courtesy of Bruce S. Thompson).
Participants hoof it up the hills outside of Dubois to visit an ancient Sheepeater Indian bighorn trapping site during our August outing co-hosted with the Dubois Museum (NBSIA photo).
Participants hoof it up the hills outside of Dubois to visit an ancient Sheepeater Indian bighorn trapping site during our August outing co-hosted with the Dubois Museum (NBSIA photo).
Education is what we are all about! Administrative Assistant Monie Finley shares information about the four North American wild sheep species with a group of students visiting the Center from China.
Education is what we are all about! Administrative Assistant Monie Finley shares information about the four North American wild sheep species with a group of students visiting the Center from China.
Member and Bighorn Bash donor Tom Lucas crafting a traditional bighorn horn bow in his Dubois studio (photo courtesy of the Dubois Frontier).
Member and Bighorn Bash donor Tom Lucas crafting a traditional bighorn horn bow in his Dubois studio (photo courtesy of the Dubois Frontier).
Volunteers Katrina and Luke Schueneman lend a hand during our 2015 Bighorn Rendezvous event held at the Bighorn Sheep Center (photo courtesy of Bruce S. Thompson).
Volunteers Katrina and Luke Schueneman lend a hand during our 2015 Bighorn Rendezvous event held at the Bighorn Sheep Center (photo courtesy of Bruce S. Thompson).
Charter members Budd Betts, Boyd Livingston and Carol Petera enjoy the sunshine and one another's company during the 2015 Bighorn Rendezvous event (photo courtesy of Bruce S. Thompson).
Charter members Budd Betts, Boyd Livingston and Carol Petera enjoy the sunshine and one another’s company during the 2015 Bighorn Rendezvous event (photo courtesy of Bruce S. Thompson).

 

 

 

From the Parks: Two Temp Exhibits Celebrate Wyoming at Natl Elk Refuge

 CLICK HERE & READ OUR NEW ISSUE ONLINE!

 

WY Beef Summer WLM 2015

A reproduction of Rock Springs' Andrew Kneeland's Duck Stamp award-winning acrylic painting.
A reproduction of Rock Springs’ Andrew Kneeland’s Duck Stamp award-winning acrylic painting.

Two temporary exhibits will be on display next month at the Jackson Hole & Greater Yellowstone Visitor Center, located at 532 N. Cache Street in Jackson. The public is invited to view the colorful exhibits, which celebrate Wyoming successes.

From the National Elk Refuge … The first exhibit commemorates the 125th anniversary of Wyoming statehood. Wyoming became the 44th state admitted to the Union on July 10, 1890. An interactive display will give visitors an opportunity to learn more about the state’s history and fun facts. Both a Wyoming and National Elk Refuge time line will be featured, along with coloring sheets, state logos, and a Wyoming quiz. Small Wyoming flags will be given to the first 200 families that visit the exhibit, which will be in the upstairs theater from July 2 through July 12.

Later in the month, visitor center staff will add a second exhibit to the upper level of the visitor center. The Wyoming Junior Duck Stamp 2015 Artwork Tour for the Top 100 entries and National Best in Show will move from its current location at the Campbell County Public Library in Gillette to the Jackson Hole & Greater Yellowstone Visitor Center from July 9 through August 2.The exhibit features an acrylic painting of two wood ducks by Andrew Kneeland, age 17, of Rock Springs. Not only was Kneeland awarded top honors in the state competition, but his artwork was judged the winner among best–of–show entries from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. His design will appear on next year’s Federal Junior Duck Stamp, scheduled to be released in June 2016.

The Junior Duck Stamp Conservation and Design Program is a dynamic educational program that uses both conservation and design principles to teach wetland habitat and waterfowl biology to students from kindergarten through high school. The program incorporates both scientific and wildlife management principles into an engaging visual arts curriculum. At the completion of their studies, participants complete a Junior Duck Stamp design, which is submitted to a state or territory contest. Top entries move on to the national competition.

 

Jackson Hole & Greater Yellowstone Visitor Center hours are from 8:00 am to 7:00 pm.

 

MADE IN WYOMING: Bill Sniffin’s book, “My Wyoming 101 Special Places”

Check out Dead Drift Fly Fishing Company's new mini store at 107 E. Grand Ave in Downtown Laramie Wyoming!
Check out Dead Drift Fly Fishing Company’s new mini store at 107 E. Grand Ave in Downtown Laramie Wyoming – for unique Wyoming wear for that avid Wyoming fan & fisherperson on your list… Click the image to connect with Dead Drift online!

 

Bill Sniffin book cover comp
Bill Sniffin releases his new Wyoming coffee table book, just in time for the holidays!

Sniffin Publishes Second Coffee Table Book about Wyoming Just in Time for Christmas

Wyoming author and journalist Bill Sniffin has just made available copies of his newest coffee table book about Wyoming, called MY WYOMING 101 Special Places. The book is a 156-page effort featuring 42 photographers and 156 color photos about the state, including 14 foldout pages.

His earlier book, Wyoming’s 7 Greatest Natural Wonders, published in 2012, has already sold 15,000 copies and is believed to be the best selling coffee table book in the state.

Sniffin, of Lander, is a photographer, journalist and entrepreneur who has lived in Wyoming for 44 years.  His weekly newspaper column appears in several newspapers each week including the Rock Springs Rocket Miner, Rawlins Daily Times, Lander Journal, Riverton Ranger, the Cheyenne Wyoming Tribune Eagle, the Evanston Uinta County Herald, Sheridan Online and occasionally in the Casper Journal, Laramie Boomerang, Pine Bluffs Post, Powell Tribune, Sundance Times, Kemmerer Gazette, Moorcroft Leader, Afton Star Valley Independent and others.

Sniffin’s newest book, MY WYOMING 101 Special Places, will be on sale the end of November. With the success of the first coffee table-style book, it only seemed practical to follow up two years later with a companion book that featured not only “natural” images but photos of man-made places and people in the photos enjoying Wyoming.

Sniffin has written three other books, which are available at fine bookstores and online at www.wyomingwonders.com.  They are all compilations of his columns.  They include Strong Winds, Blowing Snow, Slick in Spots which was published in 2011; High Altitudes, Low Multitudes in 2003; and The Best Part of America in 1993.

Over the years, Bill has been honored with the state tourism industry’s highest awards, the BIG WYO award and the Tony Bevinetto Friend of Tourism Award. His wife Nancy was honored in 2011 with Wyoming’s highest award for volunteerism, the Jefferson Award.

Sniffin and his wife are former owners of newspapers in Wyoming, Montana, South Dakota and Hawaii. The Sniffins have raised four children and have ten grandchildren. Most recently, they sold an advertising agency they founded called Wyoming Inc. and also sold, along with daughter Shelli Johnson, an internet tourism company, yellowstonepark.com.

Bill is the former chairman of the Wyoming Travel Commission, vice-chairman of the Wyoming Aeronautics Commission and has also been a member of the Wyoming P16 Education Commission. Sniffin ran for governor in 2002, losing in the Republican primary. He is on the board of directors of the Mountain West AAA Auto Club, for Alaska, Montana and Wyoming and the Wyoming Travel Industry Coalition.

More information can be found at the web site www.billsniffin.com.  One can also mail a request for the book to Box 900, Lander, WY 82520.  His Facebook page is “Wyoming books, columns by Bill Sniffin.”

Dead Drift Fly Fishing Company

Cheyenne 2015 Expo Ad

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Visit Dead Drift Fly Fishing Company Online

 

Created in Laramie, Wyoming, Pinedale natives Grant & Drew Doorn create Wyoming, Colorado (and soon Montana!) -inspired designs for the fisherperson in your life with an eye for style as much as trout. Proudly made in Wyoming, Dead Drift Fly Fishing Company is the perfect gift for the holidays – you can’t go wrong with a little brown & gold…

*click on the images to connect with their page on Dead Drift’s website…*

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“Sure the Wyoming flag has a buffalo, but Dead Drift Fly Fishing Co. thinks a trout fits just as well. Get the best fly fishing t shirts on the market today!”#thewestiscalling 

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Here’s a look at one of Dead Drift Fly Fishing Co.‘s new Colorado fly fishing designs. This is their take on the Colorado flag, “…and we thought it turned out awesome!!” #thewestiscalling

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Dead Drift Fly Company’s version of Brown and Gold! This shirt design plays off the local colors, and state pride of Wyoming, but with a Dead Drift twist. “The design style is vintage making this a classic for any fly fisherman’s closet. Not only have we made this tee true to Wyoming, we’ve made sure to create accurate markings on the Brown Trout and Gold Trout for those sticklers.” #thewestiscalling 

 

MADE IN WYOMING: High Country Horse

We are thrilled to team with the Wyoming Business Council to feature a Wyoming First business every week on our blog! Wyoming First is a program that promotes Wyoming member businesses. Visit their website (click here) to learn more about this service — and if you are a Wyoming business who’s not a member, be sure to inquire about membership! There are many benefits!

This week we are featuring High Country Horse of Laramie, WY

Oliver “Ollie” Hill, High Country Horse Laramie, WY 307-745-4553  Ollie_wy@hotmail.com  www.highcountryhorse.net

Ollie Hill got started because of his love for horses and hunting and fishing trips in the back country of Colorado and Wyoming.  His first high country experience was during a high school graduation fishing trip with his brother.  Ollie’s will to take a horse on this trip out weighed his knowledge on how to do so.

Ollie participated in Al Richardson’s noted Packing and Outfitting course during graduate school.  He became inspired to teach others how to enjoy riding, packing, cooking and learning survival skills for high country adventures.  This is when he became interested in sharing this experience and information with others to help them learn.  Packing schools and demonstrations are very much hands-on, with a custom arrangement with tack and saddle shops and with universities and colleges.

Ollie began authoring books and teaching credit courses, as well as teaching one day packing courses and demonstrations.  There are now five “how to” books that are on the market in over 40 states and over 20 countries.   These “how to” books provide information on animal packing and outfitting:

  • Packing and Outfitting Field Manual
  • Dot It Yourself Plans for Rawhide Panniers
  • Do It Yourself Plans for Mini-Pack Horse
  • A Do-It-Yourself Guild to Improvements, Repairs and Complete Rigging of Crossbuck and Decker Pack Saddles
  • Do It Yourself Plans for Deluxe Portable Camp Table

The newest product is an educational game for kids and their horses–”Kid’s Arena Horse Play Game.”  This game was created to provide a fun learning experience for kids and their horses.  Kids complete the arena course by successfully answering horsemanship questions and performing riding skills required to move on to each station.  The questions address both Western and English riding and cover a wide range of horse health, anatomy, tack and equine knowledge.  The game is for three age groups.

To order any of High Country House books or the game, visit their web site: www.highcountryhorse.net.   Customers can also order by phone or mail.

 

MADE IN WYOMING: Jackson Hole Buffalo Meat Company

visit our website & read the current issue

We are thrilled to team with the Wyoming Business Council to feature a Wyoming First business every week on our blog! Wyoming First is a program that promotes Wyoming member businesses. Visit their website (click here) to learn more about this service — and if you are a Wyoming business who’s not a member, be sure to inquire about membership! There are many benefits!

This week we are featuring Jackson Hole Buffalo Meat Company of Jackson, WY

Jackson Hole Buffalo Meat Company, Dan Marino — PO Box 1770, 1325 S. Hwy 89, #110 Jackson, WY 83001 — 800-543-6325  or  307-733-7244 — www.jhbuffalomeat.com   info@jhbuffalomeat.com

The Jackson Hole Buffalo Meat Company is based in beautiful Jackson Hole, Wyoming.  It was established in 1947 as the “Jackson Cold Storage Company.”   After 50 years of business, Jackson Hole Buffalo Meat Company was purchased by Dan Marino.   Dan has always had an interest in hunting and game processing, which led him to the purchase and business of processing buffalo and elk.  The Jackson Hole Buffalo Meat Company was fairly small and he thought he could develop and grow the company.   With a strong core of long time employee, you could definitely say this is a family business.

For 60 years Jackson Hole Buffalo Meat Company has specialized in only the finest 100% buffalo and elk meat products. Their buffalo graze naturally on open range grasslands in a ranch setting.  Jackson Hole Buffalo Meat Company supports the ranching traditions of the Great American West.  They believe in raising animals on the open range; rejecting growth hormones, steroids and antibiotics; and, Jackson Hole Buffalo Meat Company works to preserve grasslands for the next generation.

Jackson Hole Buffalo Meat Company does take custom orders.  They have a retail store in Jackson, and many stores in Jackson carry their product.  There are also stores throughout Wyoming who carry Jackson Hole Buffalo Meat Company products.    Purchases can also be made on the website at www.jacksonholebuffalomeat.com ; you can also request a catalog or give them a call at 800-543-6328.

Jackson Hole Buffalo Meat Company prices vary with the products that are sold; buffalo and elk meat range from $8.95/ lb to $40.50/lb.  They also have package deals, and there is a wide variety of gift packages and steak packages available to please almost anyone.  Jackson Hole Buffalo Meat Company products are made in the Jackson store.

FROM THE PARKS: Closure for Peregrine Falcon Area Lifted

visit our website & read the current issue

 

Closure Lifted After Peregrine Falcon Chick Fledges
from Baxter’s Pinnacle Nest

 

MOOSE, WY — The public closure at Baxter’s Pinnacle and Descent Gully near the mouth of Cascade Canyon was lifted on Thursday, August 15. This area closure went into effect on May 1 to protect an active peregrine falcon nest. Due in part to the protection provided by this wildlife closure, the adult falcons successfully reared and fledged one chick.

The Baxter’s Pinnacle peregrines experienced little to no human interruption during their incubation and chick-rearing phases thanks to active support from the park’s two authorized concessionaires for guided climbing services, and to the cooperation of Jackson Hole’s climbing community that demonstrated responsible behavior and respected the closure. Peregrines are cliff nesters and can be sensitive to human disturbance, especially during their nesting period. Falcons are quite territorial and will often abandon nests to defend their territory, which leads to nest failure and low reproductive success.

Decimated by the harmful effects of the pesticide DDT, it is believed that peregrine falcons were virtually eliminated from the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) by the 1960s. In 1980, efforts to reintroduce peregrine falcons to Grand Teton National Park were initiated in conjunction with similar efforts elsewhere in the GYE and western United States.  Between 1980 and 1986, 52 fledgling falcons were released at several sites in the Teton Range; seven to eight birds were released each time. After sufficient recovery was achieved, peregrines were delisted from the endangered species list in 1999. However, peregrine falcons remain a species of concern in Grand Teton National Park where only four nesting pairs exist. The Baxter’s nest area was first discovered in 2010, and it has produced one chick in three of the last four years (2010, 2011, and 2013). One other Teton site fledged two chicks this year.

The public closure served a second purpose: to also protect climbers from the peregrines as they will defend their nest site by dive-bombing perceived intruders. The peregrine falcon is among the world’s fastest birds, flying at 40-55 mph and diving at more than 200 mph while defending a territory or striking prey. This posed a safety risk to climbers who may have been knocked off their rock ‘perch’ and injured.

Seasonal and temporary closures for wildlife protection are common in Grand Teton to protect both wildlife and park users. Entering a posted wildlife closure is a violation that can result in a citation and fine under the code of federal regulations.

Hunting Prep, Laramie Main Street News, Art in Sheridan…

visit our website & read the current issue

NATIONAL ELK REFUGE MAKES PREPARATIONS FOR BISON & ELK HUNTING SEASONS

image from National Elk Refuge website

Wildlife managers are preparing for two upcoming hunting seasons on the National Elk Refuge. Hunting programs on the Refuge are used as a management tool to achieve optimum herd size as determined through a cooperative effort between the National Elk Refuge, Grand Teton National Park, and Wyoming Game & Fish Department managers.

The 2013 bison hunting season on the National Elk Refuge will begin on August 15 and run through January 12, 2014. Bison hunting licenses are issued by the Wyoming Game & Fish Department. A Refuge–specific bison permit is required and is provided with the State license. Individuals who have not already applied and been selected for the 2013 season are not eligible to hunt bison this season.

The Refuge bison hunting season will be comprised of 12 hunt periods of varying length, with a number of week-long breaks of non-disturbance incorporated into the season. This is intended to increase the success rate for hunters since bison, along with other animals, may learn to avoid an area with continued hunting pressure. Wildlife managers are using the hunt period structure as a tool to achieve herd objectives.

The 2013 Refuge elk hunting season will run from October 12 through December 15 and will consist of 10 consecutive hunt periods. Persons interested in hunting elk may begin applying for Refuge–specific permits beginning Wednesday, August 14. Applications for elk permits must be submitted electronically by September 25 to be entered into a computerized random draw. The results of the drawing will be posted on the application web site by September 26. 

Application for National Elk Refuge elk hunting permits is done in cooperation with the Wyoming Game & Fish Private Lands Public Wildlife Access program. Hunters may initially apply for only one hunt period per hunt unit and must already have a valid Wyoming elk license to enter the electronic drawing. Elk hunters attempting to fill two valid licenses on the Refuge during the same hunt period do not need to apply for two Refuge permits. 

Bison and elk hunting information, including general information, application procedures, regulations, maps, weapons restrictions, and access can be found on the National Elk Refuge’s web page at www.fws.gov/refuge/national_elk_refuge. Printed copies of Refuge regulations can be picked up in Jackson at the Jackson Hole & Greater Yellowstone Visitor Center (532 N. Cache Street), Wyoming Game & Fish Department (420 N. Cache Street), or the National Elk Refuge Administrative Offices (625 E. Broadway Avenue). Printable versions (PDF) of the regulations and maps are available on the web site. 

Persons traveling on Refuge roads, including Curtis Canyon and Flat Creek roads, are encouraged to familiarize themselves with hunt boundaries and be aware that hunters may be in the area.

LARAMIE MAIN STREET UPDATE

Mural by Travis Ivey 

Thanks to over 160 backers, Laramie Main Street reached their fundraising goal for the Laramie Mural Project before their deadline of July 21st and then, the donations kept coming in! When all was said and done, they raised just short of $20,000!!!

mural plan, by Travis Ivey

They have already begun to use those donations to expand the Laramie Mural Project. Check out the new murals going up downtown at 3rd and Kearney, behind the Big Dipper at 111 Ivinson and in the alley behind the Curiosity Shoppe. 

Be sure to mark your calendar for an event like you’ve never seen in downtown Laramie! Move in Weekend, Aug. 23 – 25 they will be hosting the Downtown Mash Up featuring the Gem City Car Classic and Laramie Fiber Arts Festival. This is a joint event between the University of Wyoming Athletic Dept., Laramie Main Street, DLBA and the fiber art galleries downtown.

Ever wondered what was above your favorite downtown businesses? Now is your chance to find out! Join Laramie Main Street on Friday, August 16 from 3 to 7 p.m. for a self-guided tour of the lofts and apartments downtown. Everything from cozy one bedroom units to expansive family lofts.

Tickets are $10 in advance, $15 the day of and can be purchased with cash, check or credit card from the Main Street office at 207 Grand Ave. or by calling 307-760-3355.

The Upstairs/Downtown tour is designed to promote residential space and living in the historic district as well as raise funds for the Laramie Main Street Alliance.

EVANSTON — ROUNDHOUSE FESTIVAL

Stop by the Roundhouse Festival this weekend in Evanston at the Roundhouse to purchase your 2013 HO collectors car. These will be available at the this weekends Roundhouse Festival. This year’s car commemorates the Lincoln Highway’s 100th anniversary!

SHERIDAN — SAGE Community Art Center Welcomes New Exhibits; Sheridan’s DDA Plans 3rd Thursday Fest for August

The next 3rd Thursday Festival will be held August 15! Join in for all the fun, food and music!

Check out the next round of great art exhibits at SAGE Community Art Center!

 

 

MADE IN WYOMING: Laramie Knife Works

VISIT OUR WEBSITE & READ THE CURRENT ISSUE

ORDER YOUR COPY OF WYOVORE 2013 TO BRING HOME – OR FOR YOUR IPAD

We are thrilled to team with the Wyoming Business Council to feature a Wyoming First business every week on our blog! Wyoming First is a program that promotes Wyoming member businesses. Visit their website (click here) to learn more about this service — and if you are a Wyoming business who’s not a member, be sure to inquire about membership! There are many benefits!

This week we are featuring Laramie Knife Works of Laramie, WY

Steve Torok, Laramie Knife Works Laramie, WY  307-747-7410 laramieknifeworks@msn.com   www.laramieknifeworks.com

Steve Torok is an avid hunter and fisherman and has always using knives. One day he thought it would be nice to make a knife from an animal he had harvested; so he did.  Steve’s dad was a metallurgist and working with steel is a family tradition.

Steve gets his materials from all over the world.  He once lived in New Zealand three months out of the year and he’d bring back a lot of wood each year.  Steve also gets a lot of domestic wood from people who supply AAAAA Presentation Grade woods to famous guitar makers.  He got most of the antlers and horns (including Bighorn Sheep horns) from a trading post in Lander, WY.

Steve makes 8 different types of knives. Two types of Large Linerlock folding knives with Damascus Steel blades; two types of Medium Linerlock folding knives with Damascus Steel blades; two types of Small Linerlock folding knives with Damascus Steel blades; Stainless Steel Drop Point Hunting and Skinning Knives; and Damascus Steel Drop Point Hunting and Skinning Knives.  He also occasionally makes filet knives; steak knives, and kitchen knives.

Steve uses some of the rarest woods and horns available which makes the knives unique and one-of-a-kind. Who wouldn’t like a knife made with Bighorn Sheep Horn?  He also uses a lot of gemstones including diamonds, rubies, and sapphires in his Linerlock folders which is somewhat uncommon.

Laramie Knife Works’ knives are available online at www.laramieknifeworks.com.   They are also available in Galleries (New York, Colorado, etc).  Price range: $190 (for small Linerlock folders), $225 for Stainless Steel Drop Points, $275 for Damascus Steel Drop Points, and $300 for Large Linerlock folders.

All the knives are made by hand and are guaranteed for life.  Steve is also a proud sponsor of the University of Wyoming.

WYOMING FIRST: CAP-LURES

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We are thrilled to team with the Wyoming Business Council to feature a Wyoming First business every week on our blog! Wyoming First is a program that promotes Wyoming member businesses. Visit their website (click here) to learn more about this service — and if you are a Wyoming business who’s not a member, be sure to inquire about membership! There are many benefits!  

This week we are featuring Cap-Lures of Casper, WY

Michael Walock, Cap-Lures  2400 W 39th   Casper, WY 82604   307-237-3915

cap-lures@bresnan.net     www.caplures.com

Michael Walock was born and raised in North Dakota where hunting, fishing, trapping, camping and outdoor recreation is the way of life. He began fishing at the age of two with his father and has continued for 57 years to date and plans to continue.  Back then fishing rods and reels, tackle and lures were not as modern as they are today. Michael and his father made several lures from wood or whatever they could find.  Fishing in Canada once, losing most of what little tackle he had, Michael made a spinner from a pop top can, which worked great. Many times they could not afford bait nor did they have nets to seine minnows, but they could always dig worms. Michael started to experiment with bottle caps in 1972 but could not get the cap to spin.

In 1979, Michael move to Casper, where his interests in fishing, hunting etc. became anew due to the state of Wyoming’s beauty, and the game and fish that abound here. He again started to work on the cap lure and in 2010 Michael perfected the lure while providing an outlet to recycle bottle caps. Michael’s wife and son assist in all aspects of this family oriented business, in which the Walock family takes great pride.

All the lures are functional and some people just collect them. The lures have caught many fish including the trout pictured on their web site. They can be used with live bait and at various depths with sinkers.  There is no other lure like them in the world.  The lures are original and patented; and there is the added bonus of recycling the caps.  Customers can also place custom orders.

Get in on the lure action by catching a display or signed, dated and framed collection series by retailing them in your store. Email Cap-Lures direct, visit their web site,  or visit one of these retailers.

 

Cap-Lures can be found at the retailers below:

  • Sunset Bar & Grill, Alcova
  • Sloanes General Store, Alcova
  • Rocky Mountain Discount Sports, Casper
  • Hide A Way Sports Bar, Mills
  • Sunset Liquors, Douglas
  • VFW, Casper
  • Several C Stores throughout Colorado where Distributor Wild West Munchies deliver.

Single lures start at $5.60

Single lure frames start at $15.00

6-Pack of lures framed start at $40.00

12-Pack of lures framed start at $80.00

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WYOMING FIRST: Best of the West Productions

 

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We are thrilled to team with the Wyoming Business Council to feature a Wyoming First business every week on our blog! Wyoming First is a program that promotes Wyoming member businesses. Visit their website (click here) to learn more about this service — and if you are a Wyoming business who’s not a member, be sure to inquire about membership! There are many benefits!

 This week, we are featuring Best of the West Productions of Cody, Wyoming:

Jack Peterson, President/Owner jack@thebestofthewest.net   www.longrangestore.com

Best of the West Productions (BOTW) initially formed in 2003 as a hunting television production company, formerly known as Bridger Trails Video.  Their specialty was long range hunting and the system of choice was a 7mm Magnum with a Leupold VariX 3 scope.  As BOTW used these systems, they found various shortcomings and began developing their own high quality custom gun and a rifle scope that incorporates ballistic information in a turret-reticle design.  In 2007 BOTW rolled out the Huskemaw 5-20×50 rifle scope with a custom calibrated turret that matched a specific load in a specific rifle to a specific elevation and temperature.  This rifle scope was the first of its kind and, with BOTW proprietary software, was able to precisely calculate a bullet’s trajectory in specific environmental conditions.  BOTW could also precisely calculate the amount of wind deflection that would occur and give shooters the means of compensating for wind drift.

The BOTW philosophy, which flies in the face of philosophies that have stood for generations, was not welcomed in the hunting community: (1) Bullet performance is more important than velocity; (2) Ethical hunting can occur beyond 300 yards and even at extreme ranges; (3) Compensating for wind drift is not a guessing game.  BOTW television series was the means to prove all were wrong.  They demonstrate time and time again that shots at extreme ranges are possible with this technology.

As news began to spread, Best of the West emerged as the Long Range Hunting Authority.  The success of the television series has led to the online retail store, LongRangeStore.com, which carries gear featured in the show, and a custom ammunition product line, which is specifically for extended ranges.

Featured products: Huskemaw Blue Diamond 5-20×50 rifle scope ($1,349), Huskemaw Blue Diamond 3-12×42 rifle scope ($999). Products can be purchased from LongRangeStore.com or 130 dealers located across the country.  A map of dealers is located at HuskemawOptics.com. Long range rifle systems can be custom ordered.

VISIT THE WYOMING FIRST WEBSITE:  http://www.wyomingbusiness.org/gateway/wyoming-first/4744 

VISIT THE WYOMING BUSINESS COUNCIL: http://www.wyomingbusiness.org/ 

VISIT WYOMING LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE: www.wyolifestyle.com

 

 

NATIONAL ELK REFUGE CELEBRATES 100 YEARS — AUGUST 10-12, 2012

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NATIONAL ELK REFUGE TO HOST A SERIES OF CENTENNIAL EVENTS

From the National Elk Refuge:

National Elk Refuge Manager Steve Kallin is pleased to announce an exciting line-up of programs scheduled for Friday, August 10 through Sunday, August 12 to celebrate and honor the Refuge’s 100-year history. The weekend centennial celebration dates were selected to coincide with the historic date of August 10, 1912 when an Act of Congress set aside lands “for the establishment of a winter game (elk) reserve in the State of Wyoming, lying south of the Yellowstone Park . . .”

Centennial activities will kick off at 10:30 am on Friday, August 10 at the Jackson Hole & Greater Yellowstone Visitor Center, located at 532 N. Cache Street in Jackson. An hour-long program, free of charge and open to the public, will take place on the Visitor Center lawn. Invited guests include Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar or his representative, Wyoming Governor Matt Mead, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe, and Regional Director Steve Guertin. The program will features music, speakers, a short performance by Theodore Roosevelt impersonator Case Hicks, and birthday cake. Parking will be limited; persons attending the event are encouraged to car pool, use off-site parking, or walk from START bus stops such as the Home Ranch Parking Lot located three blocks south of the Visitor Center at the corner of North Cache and Gill Streets.

The National Elk Refuge administrative offices at 675 E. Broadway Street and the Historic Miller House, located  three-quarter mile north of the Refuge’s entrance off East Broadway Street, will be closed on Friday, August 10 from 10:30 am to 12:00 pm so all Refuge staff can attend the ceremony. Case Hicks, portraying Theodore Roosevelt at Friday’s ceremony, will also offer two hour-long programs later that same weekend, giving audiences an opportunity to learn about Roosevelt’s establishment of the nation’s first wildlife refuge in 1903 and his important contributions to present-day conservation efforts. In character, Hicks will offer a special children’s program on Friday, August 10 from 1:00 to 2:00 pm, entertaining the audience with stories of his childhood and adventures. Free prizes will be given to all children ages 5-12 attending the program, including a limited number of “Teddy Bears.” A second full performance for persons of all ages will be held on Saturday, August 11 from 10:00 to 11:00 am. Both Theodore Roosevelt performances will be at the Jackson Hole & Greater Yellowstone Visitor Center and are free of charge.

Other events at the Jackson Hole & Greater Yellowstone Visitor Center include:

Friday, August 10, 3:00 to 3:30 pm: Slideshow and talk by the Jackson Hole Historical Society & Museum entitled “Homesteader Hopes and Reality in the High Country of Jackson Hole.” The program will share the history of homesteaders and settlers in the valley through stories of early day residents and historic photographs.

Friday, August 10, 4:30 to 6:30 pm: “Partners in Pathways” celebration, bicycle ride and free barbecue. Sponsored by Friends of Pathways, Jackson Hole Community Pathways, Town of Jackson, Teton County, and the National Elk Refuge. Persons planning to leave the Visitor Center to participate in the ride should park at the Home Ranch Parking Lot located three blocks south of the Visitor Center.

Saturday, August 11, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm: A ranger-led presentation giving insight to the legendary mountain men or fur trappers who lived and trapped in Jackson Hole in the 1820s and 1830s. Dressed in appropriate attire, a Grand Teton National Park ranger will discuss and demonstrate many of the specialized skills that were required of these brave and industrious individuals.

Sunday, August 12, 4:00 pm: Raffle drawing for a Henry Holdworth’s framed photo entitled, “Winter’s Refuge.” The photo is currently on display at the Visitor Center, with ticket sales available through August 12 at 3:30 pm.

A number of weekend events are also scheduled for the Historic Miller House, located ¾ mile north of the Refuge’s entrance off East Broadway Street in Jackson. They include:

Friday, August 10, 12:00 to 4:00 pm: Flint knapping demonstration by artist Tom Lucas, who has a working knowledge of the methods of ancestral tool making.

Friday, August 10, 12:00 to 4:00 pm ; Saturday, August 11 and Sunday, August 12, 10:00 am to 4:00 pm:

Period costumes and props on loan from the Jackson Hole Playhouse. A variety of costumes of all sizes will be on display and available for try-on and photographs.

Saturday, August 11, 11:00 am to 4:00 pm: Chuckwagon cooking demonstration with free samples, provided by Western Range Catering.

Sunday, August 12, 10:00 am to 4:00 pm: Quilting demonstration by the Jackson Hole Quilt Guild.

Two additional public programs will be offered at locations other than the Refuge’s two primary visitor services facilities. They include:

Friday, August 10, 1:00 to 2:30 pm: Refuge staff will lead a public feed shed tour to give participants an opportunity to learn more about the Refuge’s supplemental feeding and irrigation programs. Persons on the tour will drive caravan-style to the feed shed and must provide their own transportation. The tour, offered free of charge, will depart from the Historic Miller House at 1:00 pm.

Friday, August 10, 7:00 to 9:00 pm: An evening of storytelling and reminiscing, entitled “Refuge Reflections: A Manager’s Perspective,” will be held at the National Museum of Wildlife Art, located on the west side of Highway 89, 2½ miles north of Jackson’s Town Square. The program will include interviews with four National Elk Refuge Managers, followed by a social hour to meet and visit with each of the speakers. A schedule of activities, listed by day, can be found on the National Elk Refuge’s home page at www.fws.gov/nationalelkrefuge. “We encourage families to come out and enjoy a variety of fun, educational programs and be a part of the celebration,” Kallin said.

For further information on any of the individual events, please call the Refuge administrative offices at 307.733.9212.

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