Give a Sweet Wyoming Gift No Matter Where You Are! + Bent & Rusty GROWS!

 

SERENDIPITY CONFECTIONS OF WYOMING SHIPS THEIR DELICIOUS CARAMELS & GOODIES NATIONWIDE!

VISIT SERENDIPITY CONFECTIONS ONLINE – CLICK HERE!


Want to give a Sweet Wyoming Gift, no matter where you are? It’s online and EASY!  Visit Serendipity Confections for a special deal that lasts through Saturday, November 25 — and visit them online after November 25 as their holiday yumminess keeps giving no matter what day it is!

Social Media Fans – Follow the links:

LIKE SERENDIPITY CONFECTIONS ON FACEBOOK

FOLLOW SERENDIPITY CONFECTIONS ON INSTAGRAM

TWEET, TWEET!  SERENDIPITY CONFECTIONS IS ON TWITTER TOO!


LARAMIE’S BENT & RUSTY COTTON COMPANY GROWS UNDERGROUND THIS HOLIDAY WEEKEND!

 

WYOMING MADE: NoSo Patches Brings Personality to Your Outerwear

LANDER LIVE EVENTS COMING UP!

THURSDAY, JULY 27, 6-9 PM –> THE ITALS

FREE CONCERT AT JAYCEES PARK!

MORE INFO AT … LANDERLIVEMUSIC.COM

 

Noso Puffy Patches of Jackson:  Personality for Your Outerwear

text & images courtesy Noso Puffy Patches

Visit them online:  nosopatches.com

Noso Puffy Patches was launched in Summer 2016, using a combination of crowdfunding and direct retailer outreach to make the patches accessible to the widest range of consumers, just in time for the biggest outdoor season. Based in Jackson, Wyoming, and manufactured in the USA, NOSO presents Puffy Patches, the fashionable do-it-yourself repair and embellishment patches for clothes and outdoor gear.

NOSO Puffy Patches are the coolest all-purpose patches that fix rips, holes and gashes, or just a lack of personal style. Make your jacket eye catching, not for the holes, but for the design you’ve created. Personalize your long-life gear like sleeping bags, tents or the apparel you love most, whether it’s a nylon windbreaker or down jackets, anything can be revamped or restored.

When your favorite jacket springs a leak, NOSO Puffy Patches save the day with style and versatility. Super easy to use, Puffy Patches are made of 30D nylon ripstop, uncoated and down proof with a high tenacity and heat/light inhibiting qualities. NOSO’s adhesive lasts longer than others on the market. No sewing necessary, the heat-activated technology creates a permanent bond without an iron. Just throw it in the dryer or better yet, leave it in the sun to activate. Puffy Patches are incredibly durable and can withstand extreme weather conditions and multiple washes, without gumming up on the sides.

“I am extremely excited to launch NOSO Puffy Patches,” says Kelli Jones, Founder at NOSO. “I wanted to find a better way to extend the life of your favorite gear, as well as an outlet for users to express themselves in the outdoor space. It has been an amazing process, and I’m thrilled with the product and the possibilities.”

To extend the life of your gear, or express your individuality, Puffy Patches are available in six different colors, thirteen shapes, and five variety packages of three. They are available for purchase online!

All patches come in the following colors:

Senator Mike Enzi Invites WY High School Juniors to Apply for Senate Page

Wyoming Senator Mike Enzi Invites Wyoming High School Juniors to Apply for Senate Page

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Senator Mike Enzi, R-Wyo., is encouraging Wyoming juniors in high school to apply to be a Senate page for the fall session in Washington, DC.

There are 30 page positions in the U.S. Senate each session. One of those positions is reserved for Enzi to sponsor a student from Wyoming to serve as a page. The deadline for applications is June 27.

 

“Along with allowing students a front row seat during debates in the Senate, pages have the opportunity to explore the nation’s capital and interact with students from across the country,” said Enzi. “The program provides experiences that participants will carry with them forever.”

 

Pages play an important role in the day-to-day operations of the Senate. Duties consist primarily of delivering correspondence and legislative material within the congressional complex. Other duties include preparing the chamber for Senate sessions and carrying bills and amendments to the appropriate people on the Senate floor.

Pages attend classes at the U.S. Senate Page School until 9:45 a.m. and then work until 4:00 p.m. or until the Senate adjourns for the day. The Senate Page School provides the necessary requirements for a junior year course of study.

Fall page eligibility is limited to rising juniors in high school who will be 16 or 17 years old by the date of appointment. Applicants must have a minimum grade point average of 3.0.

 

Pages live in Webster Hall located near the Capitol and receive a stipend to cover the cost of the residence. Breakfast and dinner are provided daily.

The fall session runs from September 5 to January 26. Applications and additional information can be found here. Further questions can be directed to Dianne Kirkbride in Senator Enzi’s Cheyenne office at 307-772-2477 or Dianne_Kirkbride@enzi.senate.gov.

Pioneer Museum’s Sheep Shearing Day in Lander

Pioneer Museum Sheep Shearing Day — A Wonderful Woolly Day!

text & images courtesy Pioneer Museum, Lander

On the prettiest day of the spring so far, over 300 people came out to Lander’s Pioneer Museum to celebrate the history and heritage of the sheep industry in Fremont County and have fun.

It was the third annual Sheep Shearing Day, which has been a popular spring event at the museum. Designed to recognize the long history of the sheep industry in the area, there were shearing demonstrations, crafts for kids, a petting zoo, horseback rides and talks on the history of sheep. Sponsored by the Lander and Riverton McDonalds, it was the first Kids Exploration program of the summer.

A new addition this year were lamb burgers grilled up by the Fremont County Pioneer Association. The lamb was provided by the Wyoming Wool Growers Association (WWGA), and was a huge hit with people.

Amy Hendricks of the WWGA said one of their missions was to get people more aware of how important the sheep industry still is to Wyoming’s economy. The fresh lamb is just one product produced in the state by the industry.

John Farr of Encampment did several talks on the history of the sheep business from the time of Christ to the present. “What a wonderful event,” he said. “It’s a great way to get young people involved in our history.”

According to Museum Curator Randy Wise, Sheep Shearing Day will be back. “We are always adding new things and making it a bigger, better event.” Wise said that there are many events throughout the summer at the museum, from Treks and Speakers to kids exploration programs. Two upcoming events for kids are Kids Gold Panning Day May 11, and Pioneer Arts and Crafts June 10.

Call the museum to sign up (space in the two kid’s program is limited) or check the museum website www.fremontcountymuseums.com for more information.

Chabad Wyoming Passover Event in Jackson, April 10-18, 2017

 

click the image for ticket purchase to experience An Evening with Garrison Keillor

Join Chabad Wyoming for a Passover Seder you will remember for a lifetime!

 

Relive the exodus, discover the eternal meaning of the Haggadah, and enjoy a community Seder complete with hand baked Shmurah Matzah, an international selection of Kosher wines, and an elegant dinner spiced with unique traditional customs.

Experience the liberation and freedom of Passover. Discover the Seders relevance today.

First Seder:  Monday, Aprl 10 at 6:30 pm … Wort Hotel, 50 N. Glenwood, Jackson

Couvert:  $36 per person

Sponsor:  $360 (includes family of up to five)

No one will be turned away due to lack of funds.

RSVP here

WYO WOMAN & FAMILY: Menarche … What the Heck is that Word & How do I tell my Daughter?!

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In this & future blogs, we’ll feature writing by students of the University of Wyoming’s Family & Consumer Science Department, within the College of Agriculture. A select number of professors have chosen to provide student papers & projects to be displayed via our blog and new e-magazine. Keep an eye out for more topics on parenting, growth & development, learning, relationships, nutrition and more!

 


“Blood is Going to Come From WHERE?!”

by Jordan Kucera and Alyssa McElwain, PhD, CFLE

Across generations, women can recall their personal experiences in early adolescence when they encountered their first period. For some women, this experience was welcome and expected, whereas others experienced shock, distress, and confusion. Research suggests that these experiences can have either positive or negative associations with becoming a woman based on the information (or lack thereof) young girls receive prior to their first period or menstruation.

On average, girls get their first period around age 12-13; however, there is great individual difference and girls can get their period between ages 9-16. Some parents miss the window of opportunity to prepare their daughters because puberty is occurring at younger ages. Research shows that when discussions take place before puberty, young girls have a more accurate understanding of what will happen to their bodies and a more positive outlook on becoming a woman. For this reason, it is a good idea to begin conversations about puberty sooner rather than later.

Information about menstruation typically comes from our mothers, but also comes from friends, female relatives, books, magazines, school, the internet, movies, and television. These sources may provide conflicting, inaccurate, and even pessimistic perspectives about menstruation. For example, girls sometimes think they cannot use tampons until they are older or that they should not be physically active during their period, neither of which are true. Some girls receive little to no information and feel confused about this important aspect of the female body.

A study conducted with early adolescents (youth ages 10 to 14) who had not yet begun menstruation, found that few girls were knowledgeable about the menstrual cycle. Many girls reported negative attitudes about menstruation and some even compared their menstruation to having an illness. A majority of girls believed that their periods would bring incurable and unavoidable pain that would prohibit them from participating in social activities or attending school. One study found that some girls believe they need to hide their menstruation from family members and friends (especially males). Although a majority of girls thought that having your period was a sign of maturity, many girls persisted in having negative beliefs such as the idea that menstruation is embarrassing, uncomfortable, or even shameful.

Lack of information and misunderstandings about periods can lead young girls to feel overwhelmed and extremely frightened about what is happening to their bodies when they encounter their first period. Research shows that poor overall experiences with menstruation are linked to low self-esteem, poor body image, and issues with sexuality. Accurate information, provided at earlier ages from a variety of sources that include not only the mother, but also informative education programs can allow girls to have a better overall experience and view menstruation more positively.

Knowledge is power and accurate, positive information provides young girls with more optimistic and all-encompassing knowledge regarding the processes involved in maturation. See the talking points below for important information to include in a conversation with the young girl in your life.

Period-Positive Talking Points:

  • Menstruation is a healthy and normal part of being female.
  • You can continue to have a normal, active life during your period.
  • The women in your life have your back! We’ve all been there and are understanding, so don’t be afraid to ask questions or even ask a stranger for a pad or tampon if you need one.
  • Girls start getting their period at different ages and bleeding usually occurs for 5-7 days each month, about every 28 days. It’s normal for some women to get premenstrual symptoms (PMS) like cramps, headaches, and bloating before their period.

 

References

Amann-Gainotti, M. (1986). Sexual socialization during early adolescence: The menarche.             Adolescence, 21, 703.

Burrows, A., & Johnson, S. (2005). Girls’ experiences of menarche and menstruation. Journal      of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, 23, 235-249.

Newton, V. (2016). Positioning periods in context: Contemporary discourses and dilemmas.         In Everyday Discourses of Menstruation (pp. 49-70). Palgrave Macmillan: UK.

Moore, S. (1995). Girls’ understanding and social constructions of menarche. Journal of   Adolescence, 18, 87-104.

Rembeck, G., Möller, M., & Gunnarsson, R. (2006). Attitudes and feelings towards menstruation and womanhood in girls at menarche. Acta Pædiatrica, 95: 707–714.

Uskul, A. K. (2004). Women’s menarche stories from a multicultural sample. Social Science & Medicine59, 667-679.

Fall Colors with Steve Stanze

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I was up in Laramie, Wyoming last weekend visiting my grandparents with my sister. We came up to visit them for two weeks when we were kids and wanted to relive some of the memories. Saw a mama moose and two babies right off a trail in Vedauwoo and caught the beautiful scenery in the Snowy Range Mountains.

–Steve Stanze, St. Louis

*(Thanks, Steve!)*

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#wykidsaregood & events coming up!

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SHARE YOUR #WYKIDSAREGOOD MOMENTS WITH US!

As we prepare to launch our new Wy Woman & Family Magazine website & first online magazine, we want to hear from you! We’re looking for stories of Wyoming kids (of any age!) doing good things for others!

Helping someone in need … volunteering to help others … giving comfort to a person in need … being nice to someone … big or small, we want to hear it all!

No prizes, no gimmicks, no giveaways — just a chance to applaud Wyoming kids for being amazing.

We’re going to blog & share these stories as they come in, so don’t wait! Each story will include the child’s first name and town where they live. Pictures are welcome, but not required. Please include a statement on your willingness to publish your child’s first name, Wyoming home town and photo (if included/desired) on our blog.

Email to editor@wyolifestyle.com – no deadlines, we’ll keep them going as they come in!

Search the hashtag #wykidsaregood to find our stories that we share …

#wykidsaregood 


Upcoming Wyoming Events!

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Circle J Ranch event 2016

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Harvest Party, City Park in Lander Wyoming! October 1, 9 am - 12 noon
Harvest Party, City Park in Lander Wyoming! October 1, 9 am – 12 noon

MY WYOMING

A Trip Down Memory Lane in Sheridan plus Buffalo and Two Mountain Passes

By Bill Sniffin

As readers of this column know, I am no fan of the “new” JC Penney Company.

It is my contention that old James Cash Penney (whose first store was right here in Wyoming, in Kemmerer), is spinning in his grave as how his successors have managed to ruin that company.

But I loved the old Penney’s and I took a trip down memory lane at that company’s long-time store on Main Street of Sheridan recently. There, smack in the heart of the town, is an old-fashioned Penney Store, complete with a basement, a half upstairs and, well, the only edifices missing were the pneumatic tubes sending sales tickets flying around the store.

My first Penney store experience was in Oelwein, Iowa, and it was a scene right out of the movie, A Christmas Story. And that store 60 years ago looked just like the one there in Sheridan today.

Here in Lander, when I first came to work at the Journal, one of our biggest advertisers was the JC Penney Store, again, right in the heart of our downtown.  And yes, it had a half upstairs and it had a basement.  I think tubes were still there which would whistle sales tickets from the various cash registers back to the bookkeeping department. Even by today’s standards, these tubes were space age. Amazing.  They provided a way to quickly move information around prior to the age of computers.

On this trip, we took two different scenic drives on our way to and from Sheridan.

First, we traveled to Greybull so we could take US 16 up Shell Canyon and over the mountain. The weather was beautiful and we even stopped and checked out the Dinosaur tracks outside of Shell. Also, took a photo of the canyons there at the Big Horn Mountains that seem to form a “W” and a “Y” — is that there or was I just imagining it?

Near Burgess Junction I ran into Ed Kingston at the Elk View Inn.  First met Ed 15 years ago.  He has done well and aged better than me. The lodge is beautiful. It and Bear Lodge plus a few other lodges make that area a snowmobile and ATV mecca.

We encountered terrible fog descending into Dayton and on our way to Sheridan and settled into a rainy trip.

Bob Grammens and Kim Love had me on the radio for a couple of mornings and that was sure fun. Radio appears to be struggling in some communities, but not Sheridan. Lots going on in that area. Don’t touch that dial!

Although energy is a big deal in the Sheridan area, you would not notice it by how the Main Street feels.  It is certainly lively including a new store started by a 13-year old boy. Amazing.  His name is Luke Knudsen and he started a store called The Old General Store, which features antiques.

Another neat store is the Best Out West store owned by Christy Love, Kim’s sister.

The remodeled Sheridan Inn is a real treat. The old strucure originally built by Buffalo Bill Cody is now a true modern classic.

One of the premier craft breweries in the state is the Black Tooth establishment, which exists in an old auto garage.  Great beer and a great location.

Our trip was designed as loop drive so we headed south to Buffalo and were impressed by how busy the Sports Lure store was there in the main business district. Small towns are lucky to have local-owned stores like it and the Office to cater to local needs.

It is hard not to love Buffalo’s Occidental Hotel. What a beautiful job its owners have done to restore it.

This is the heart of Longmire country but despite looking for them, none of the characters were to be seen on this day. Longmire is the name of a popular TV series based on books by Craig Johnson of Ucross.

While in Buffalo, I also looked for the infamous “Bench Sitters,” made popular by the Sagebrush Sven columns in the Buffalo Bulletin.  It was the wrong time of day to see them, too, I guess.

Heading home, we headed up into the cloudy Big Horn Mountains over Tensleep Pass.  Ran into fog, rain, slush, snow and wind but got through it.  Lots of highway construction on the very top. The flag people were dressed like Eskimos.

Worland and Thermopolis were both quiet on this wet Friday evening, although it was sure tempting to take a dip into a hot thermal pool on a cold, wet shivery night.  But we kept on going.

Got home just as the sun was going down, which was our goal. Hate that driving at night in a storm.

What a great loop drive it was, though. The passes were full of amazing color.  I am sure the rain and snow pretty much wiped out most of those pretty leaves, which impressed us at the time. This all occurred during the fall solstice, which here in Wyoming, truly marks a real change of seasons.

 

 

 

 

Laramie’s Higher Ground Fair 2016

Higher Ground Fair 2016

A new regional fair to celebrate rural living in the Rocky Mountains is coming to Laramie September 24 and 25. It’s been said there’s no such thing as an original idea, but according to Gayle Woodsum, a long-time community organizer and founder of the fair’s sponsor, Feeding Laramie Valley, mixing great traditional ideas in a new way can result in something better than the original.

The Higher Ground Fair is designed to bring together a truly diverse mix of participants and fairgoers as it provides space for valuing the intersection of music, art, food, cultural awareness, traditional family farming and ranching, new agriculture, gardening, health and wellness, social action, animals, the environment and sustainable living, as a means of learning from each other to create a better future for all Rocky Mountain communities in the six states of Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming, and the Native First Nations that also call the region home.

“This is a challenging time in our world,” says Woodsum, for whom the Higher Ground Fair has long been a dream. “Individuals and communities are inundated by messages of fear and hate, underscored by the growing reality of health, economic and social disparities between people of privilege and people just struggling to survive. Yet, this is also a time of incredible ingenuity and hope coming from people determined to find community solutions to worldwide problems.

“Residents of the rural Rocky Mountains have always honored the grandeur of their environment by being resourceful, capable and tenacious. The Higher Ground Fair is an opportunity to celebrate their history and simultaneously set a new stage for leveraging community forces to develop creative possibilities for a better world — a stage that also promises a lot of fun.”

Organizes of the Higher Ground Fair have spread their reach wide to launch this new event with something for everyone:  musical concerts and dance performances; art exhibits and workshops; agricultural displays and demonstrations; a llama and alpaca performance and fleece show; food vendors featuring regionally sourced ingredients; inspiring educational workshops and presentations; companion and wilderness animals; regional arts and crafts vendors; a kids adventure zone; gardening, composting and recycling exhibits — all at one event. All designed to bring people together who typically enjoy such offerings in separate environments.

Vendor and display booth spaces are being offered free of charge this debut year for the Higher Ground Fair, with participation applications being accepted for consideration as long as space remains available. A large volunteer corps will be responsible for the fair’s complex infrastructure, with volunteer recruiting incentives including free t-shirts, free fair entry, free lunches and free on-site camping. Fairgoers over the age of 12 will pay a $10 entry fee at the gate, $8 in advance; with tickets for elders 65 and over going for $8 at the gate and $6 in advance. Children 12 and under are free. Contact and other fair information can be found at www.highergroundfair.org, by calling 307.223.4399 or emailing info@highergroundfair.org.

 

Downtown Sheridan Wraps Up Summer!

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From the Downtown Sheridan Association…

The days are getting shorter, and I for one look forward to a little slower pace…but, honestly there is still so much going on and so many reasons to visit downtown, I never do seem to get much time to unwind!

This week, our final 3rd Thursday will feature the Craft Brothers and the Sheridan High School varsity teams pep rally. Be sure to stop by the main stage for the first ever “flash mob” to be held on Main Street at 7pm!

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The following Thursday at the weekly farmers’ market on Grinnell Plaza, CATO Ranch and the Cottonwood Shop are sponsoring the first “Sheridan Amateur Chopped” contest! A lively crew of local foodies will be cooking up some delicious meals comprised mostly of locally raised meats and produce. The last Thursday of September, the 29th, the Sheridan Farmers’ Market sponsored by Landon’s Greenhouse, will close out the downtown market season here on Grinnell Plaza. However, Saturday, October 8, the DSA will again cosponsor the Sheridan Local Food Expo/Fall Harvest Market. This year’s event will take place October 5th through October 8th, kicking off with a premier screening of the PBS/Farm to Fork Episode of, “Compost” at the Sheridan Public Library on Wednesday the 5th at 5:30pm.

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Friday, October 7th is the Farm to Plate Gala Dinner at the Barn in Big Horn. A four course seasonally inspired dinner prepared by Chef Antonia Armenta Miller, of CATO Ranch, will be paired with wines from Jackson Hole Winery. The tickets are $75 each. This fee helps raise funds to benefit the Local Foods Expo group with a portion of the proceeds also benefiting the local youth programs that promote our commitment to support, promote and educate the community on the importance of buying and eating locally. For more information, please contact Bonnie Gregory at 307-752-5712.

The weekend will wrap up on Saturday with the Farmers’ Market Fall Festival at the Whitney Academic Center on the Sheridan College Campus. Sponsored by Wyoming Roofing, this market combines the Sheridan & Landon’s Farmers Markets from 9am till 11am with live music by Crooked Mountain and featuring other seasonal events. The morning market will be followed by a discussion panel entitled, “Eating, Growing & Selling” at noon. For more information, please contact Donald Legerski at 307-683-7849 or email sheridanlocalfoods@gmail.com.

 

Finally, the Historic District Promotions Committee continues to focus on year-round shop local campaigns that help to increase awareness of what our downtown has to offer as well as create incentives and enthusiasm for local shoppers during the off-holiday season. The October Hunting for Bucks shop local campaign incorporates the ever popular hunting season as well as rewarding locals for shopping downtown by offering “chamber bucks” as a weekly prize for shoppers throughout the month of October. The City of Sheridan has generously agreed to sponsor the campaign again this year. Last year, the first Hunting For Bucks campaign was a huge success with $800 in chamber bucks distributed to 21 lucky shoppers.

For more information, please call 307-672-8881 or email

 

Wyoming Real Estate: 3906 Tam O’Shanter in Riverton; Cornerstone Group Realty, LLC

Casper Fall Poster 2016smaller new logo 2013Realty Office:  215 S. Broadway Riverton WY  82501

307.856.1818    www.cgrsells.com


FOR SALE:  3906 Tam O’Shanter, Riverton, Wyoming

$199,900

Motivated Sellers – Price Reduced!

Contact Judy Bauman-Broker/Owner

307.856.1818 or 307.851.1756

judy@cgrsells.com

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Judy

Charming home nestled in a quiet & pristine neighborhood, boasting an open floor plan — easy for entertaining! French doors off of the dining room lead to the private backyard with mature landscaping and a large deck, perfect for summertime cookouts. The finished basement offers a family room, laundry room with extra storage, full bath, bedroom w/double closets, & an extra room w/an egress window; ideal for an in-home office. This home is sure to fly off the market! Call us today to schedule your private tour.

 

*3 beds/1.75 baths

*8667 sq. ft. lot

*1824 sq. ft. house

*2 car attached garage

*Heating: forced air gas

*Cooling: Central Air

*Golf Course Lot

*Excellent landscaping

*Automatic Sprinklers

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Wyoming Real Estate: 316 N. 2nd W. in Riverton; Cornerstone Group Realty, LLC

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Realty Office:  215 S. Broadway Riverton WY  82501

307.856.1818    www.cgrsells.com


SOLD:  316 N. 2nd W., Riverton, Wyoming

(But they have others!)

$219,000

Contact Judy Bauman-Broker/Owner

307.856.1818 or 307.851.1756

judy@cgrsells.com

316 (3) Judy

 

Updated 1940’s home with lots of charm and all the space you need for modern living. You’ll be pleasantly surprised by the creative electric fireplace in the living room, tile baths and flooring, hardwood flooring, spacious second level bedrooms, bonus basement rooms, and the charming back yard offering  mature landscaping and a large  patio-convenient for entertaining. Tasteful and timeless…call Judy Bauman today to schedule your private tour!

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Features:

¨ 4 Bedrooms/2.5 Bathrooms

¨ 2496 Sq. Ft.

¨ 11, 250 sq. ft. Lot

¨ Heating: Forced Air Gas

¨ Sewer: City

¨ Water: City

¨ Alley Access

¨ Taxes: $1,481 in 2015

¨ 2 car detached garage

 

3rd Thursday Sheridan for July is Coming! JULY 21

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Downtown Sheridan Association’s

Third Thursday Street Festival !

JULY 21 ON SHERIDAN’S MAIN STREET

from 5pm to 9pm

featuring on the Main stage

GARY SMALL & ONE EARTH

at the Bank of the West stage

Doug Andrews

3rd Thursday Sheridan sponsors 2016

Thanks you to these sponsors! Funded in part by Sheridan Travel & Tourism and the City of Sheridan.