NEWS FROM THE PARKS: Teton Employees Receive Fire Service Awards

Teton Interagency Fire Employees Receive 2010 Regional National Park Service Awards

On behalf of the National Park Service Intermountain Region (IMR), Grand Teton National Park Superintendent Mary Gibson Scott and Bridger-Teton National Forest Supervisor Jacque Buchanan presented two Teton Interagency Fire employees with awards for excellence in fire management. Grand Teton National Park Assistant Fire Management Officer Mack McFarland received the IMR Interagency Fire Management Leadership Award and Martha Williamson, Teton Interagency fire planner, received the IMR Fire Management Achievement Award.

McFarland’s leadership award recognizes his exemplary service and dual role for the past three years as a fuels specialist for Grand Teton National Park and as the north zone assistant fire management officer for fuels on the Bridger-Teton National Forest.

“Mack had the vision and skills to effectively work within each agency’s constraints and overcome any obstacles to successfully complete fuels treatment projects for both agencies,” said IMR Fire Management Officer Michael Davin. “Mack is a great example of a service-first approach that is truly working.”

McFarland began working seasonally at Grand Teton in 1990 and became a permanent employee in 1996. During his tenure as the interagency fuels specialist, McFarland managed several large-scale projects: the multi-year Lower Gros Ventre Prescribed Fire and the Buffalo Valley Fuels Environmental Assessment, among others.

“On behalf of the Intermountain Region, I extend our thanks and appreciation to Mack McFarland for his dedication and commitment to the teamwork, integration and cooperation between the Bridger-Teton National Forest and Grand Teton National Park,” said IMR Director John Wessels. “His skill in ‘leading by example’ demonstrates a genuine interagency spirit.”

Williamson came to Bridger-Teton National Forest and Grand Teton National Park as the interagency fire planner and fire GIS specialist in 2008. She earned the fire achievement award for her significant GIS support and contributions in training for the IMR Wildland Fire and Aviation Management Program.

“Martha provided invaluable direction in creating hands-on training for National Parks Service fire personnel within the Wildland Fire Decision Support System,” said IMR Director John Wessels. “In addition, she has participated in and provided direction for our regional fire geo-database.

Martha works hard to find practical solutions to fire spatial analysis, risk assessment and solution development to better protect people, firefighters, and natural resources.”

The Intermountain Region of the National Park Service spans eight states from Montana to Texas, and includes 92 parks and national historic sites.

WYOMING ARTS: Jackson’s Lynn Friess Wins Award

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Jackson Hole Author Lynn Friess Wins Gold 2011 “IPPY” Award

Picture book Western Lullaby takes a first place in Independent Publisher awards

Jackson, Wyoming – May 24, 2011 – A Jackson Hole picture book, Western Lullaby, written by Lynn Estes Friess and illustrated by Barbara Leonard Gibson (Mariposa Ranch Press, 2010), has won a gold medal in the national 2011 Independent Publisher Book Awards. Launched in 1996, the “IPPY” Awards are designed to bring increased recognition to deserving but often unsung titles from independent publishers.  Western Lullaby by Jackson Hole resident Lynn Friess took first place in the category of “Children’s Picture Books (7 & Under).”

Author Friess, a grandmother of 10 and avid art collector, wrote the award-winning Western Lullaby as a bedtime story focusing on the nocturnal sights and sounds of the West, combining the dreamy tale of a little cowgirl’s nighttime surroundings with vivid illustrations by Gibson of the Western outdoors.  An audio CD of the lullaby that inspired the book is included, performed by Wyoming singer-songwriter Marilee Gordon.

This year’s “IPPY” Awards presented gold, silver and bronze medals to winners in 69 national categories as well as regional awards and 12 Outstanding Books of the Year.  Western Lullaby tied for the gold in its category with Henry! You’re Late Again! by Mary Evanson Bleckwehl, illustrated by Brian Barber (Beaver’s Pond Press).  According to Independent Publisher, the 346 medal-winning books for 2011 came from a pool of 3,907 total entries, representing 45 U.S. states plus the District of Columbia, seven Canadian provinces, and seven countries overseas.  A full listing of the 2011 “IPPY” Award winners is available here on the Independent Publisher website.

Western Lullaby was the first picture book written by Friess, a close friend and supporter of the Jackson Hole-based National Museum of Wildlife Art.  In September 2010, Friess published her second picture book, Jackson Hole’s Carl Discovers Wildlife Art, illustrated by John Potter, and written as an engaging way to introduce children to wildlife art and the museum.  The Carl title is the first in a planned series, and proceeds from the book help sponsor programs, exhibits and operating support for the museum.

Media Contact: Ponteir Sackrey, National Museum of Wildlife Art, 307.732.5444, psackrey@wildlifeart.org

 

ART IN WY: Architecture Speaks in Black & White

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Architecture Speaks In Black & White – photography by Michael Flicek

Architecture has much to say about many aspects of human existence.  Structures have voice.  Much as the great thinkers and philosophers throughout time have struggled with universal human concerns like truth, beauty, and spirituality or logic and metaphysics, so have architects throughout time worked to interpret these human concerns through their use of light, space, and form.  All of this has been, and is, done within the context of a time and place that carries with it particular cultural, political, and economic conditions and particular climactic and geographic conditions.  From the early drawings on cave walls to the utility of log houses in early America to the icons of modernity across time in the great cities of the world, human design has and will continue to leave a mark on our world. –  excerpt from Michael Flicek’s artist statement

The Corridor Gallery proudly presents “Architecture Speaks In Black & White”, a photographic exhibit by Casper resident and artist, Michael Flicek. Michael has been shown in numerous galleries nationwide and is an award-winning photographer with a vast resume´. Architecture Speaks In Black & White will be Michael Flicek’s second solo show to Casper, Wyoming.

Michael is partial to black and white photography working in the digital realm. Capturing the image on locations is only the beginning of his process. Once Michael composes a photograph, he’s on to the next step of immersion within his “digital darkroom”. Michael then manipulates the image to fit his vision of a final work of art. Once satisfied, he creates immaculate digital prints in limited edition on archival quality glossy baryta finished paper. Due to the high quality print and stock used, Michael’s photographs take on a traditional look.

“Architecture Speaks In Black & White” will only be featured for 3 days at the Corridor gallery. The press and public are invited to attend the free opening reception on Friday, May 20th at 7pm. The public and press are invited to attend an artist’s talk with Michael on Saturday, May 21st at 2:00pm. Michael’s work will show only through Sunday, May 22nd. We hope to see you there!

Event Details

Event: “Architecture Speaks In Black & White” by Michael Flicek

Specifics: Located at The Corridor Gallery: 120 E. 2nd St. Casper, WY 82601

Tickets Cost/Avail: Free Admission

Opening Reception: Friday, May 20th at 7:00pm

Artist’s Talk: Saturday, May 21st at 2:00pm

Open Showing: Saturday, May 21st 10:00am to 5:00pm

Sunday, May 22nd noon to 4pm

Information: For more information, please contact The Corridor Gallery at (307) 333-7035, Reed at (307) 259-8001 or visit www.thecorridorgallery.com

Michael Flicek: mflicek@michaelflicekgallery.com, 307-259-3963

Hope to see you there!

Reed Merschat

The Corridor Gallery

120 E. 2nd St.

Casper, WY 82601

g. (307) 333-7035

m. (307) 259-8001

GTNP: Bicyclist Injured in Truck Collision

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Bicyclist Injured in Collision with Delivery Truck

A 54-year-old Jackson, Wyoming resident received multiple injuries when he was struck by the rearview mirror of a delivery truck while biking on Highway 26/89/191, about 9:15 a.m. on Wednesday, May 11. The delivery truck, driven by a 54-year-old Jackson man, and the bicyclist were both northbound on the highway when the accident occurred approximately one mile north of the Airport Junction in Grand Teton National Park. The cyclist was wearing a bike helmet.

After making contact with the bicyclist, the driver of the truck quickly stopped and made a 911 call on his cell phone to summon help. Teton Interagency Dispatch Center received the rerouted 911 call from the Teton County Sherriff’s Office at 9:19 a.m. and a park ranger immediately responded to the accident site.

The ranger provided emergency medical care to the bicyclist and sent him by park ambulance to St. John’s Medical Center in Jackson.

Further details about this incident will be available at the conclusion of an accident investigation.

About 3.8 million people travel by vehicle on Grand Teton National Park roads each year. While accidents between vehicles and bicycles or pedestrians are rare, park managers completed a transportation plan in 2007 that included, among other goals, a system of multi-use pathways within the park to separate pedestrians and bicyclists from vehicle traffic.

Construction of a separated pathway running parallel to Highway 26/89/191 is scheduled to begin on June 1, and a 6.3 mile pathway segment from Moose Junction to the park’s south boundary will join a pathway system being built from the Town of Jackson toward the park. Once constructed, the entire pathway (approximately 12 miles) will provide a measure of safety, separating non-motorized users from motorists on Highway 26/89/191.